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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Disguise and Queries
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0363.  Monday, 17 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
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 >
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Mar 1997 11:37:39 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362 Qs: Disguise

[2]     From:   Peter L Groves <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:27:53 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Disguise

[3]     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:35:56 +1100 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Disguise

[4]     From:   Lisa Hopkins  <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 97 10:34:00 GMT
        Subj:   Two queries and an answer


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
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 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Mar 1997 11:37:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0362 Qs: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362 Qs: Disguise

Simon,,

Disguise doesn't seem to work in Much Ado when Beatrice speaks
caustically to the  apparently disguised Benedick. The other women also
seem to see through the disguises worn by the masquers.

Helen Ostovich
McMaster University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:27:53 +0000
Subject: 8.0362  Qs: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Disguise

Romeo at the Capulets' ball is recognised by Tybalt, but I suppose he's
not strictly in disguise, only masked.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:35:56 +1100 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Disguise

Gallathea and Phyllida in John Lyly's _Gallathea_ are both disguised
(unknown to each other) as boys, and in the course of their
conversations begin to suspect that all may not be what it seems. But
they don't actually see through the disguises until their fathers reveal
their real identities.


[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins  <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 97 10:34:00 GMT
Subject:        Two queries and an answer

a)      For Simon Morgan-Russell:  in John Ford's last play _The Lady's
Trial_ Benatzi visits his wife Levidolche in disguise.  She recognises
him but does not let on until the end of the play.

b)      I was reading _King Lear_ last night and was struck for the first
time by the phrase 'milk of Burgundy'.  The Arden editor glosses this as
something like 'pasture - the effect for the cause', but does anyone
know of any other comments?

c)      Wildly improbable as this may sound, I have a vague memory of reading
somewhere that inmates in Bedlam actually were made to jump off things
as a way of getting them to snap out of it.  Has anyone else ever come
across this, or has my subconscious gone off the rails here?

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

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.  Monday, 17 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Helen Ostovich <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 16 Mar 1997 11:37:39 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362 Qs: Disguise

[2]     From:   Peter L Groves <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:27:53 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Disguise

[3]     From:   Adrian Kiernander <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:35:56 +1100 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Disguise

[4]     From:   Lisa Hopkins  <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 97 10:34:00 GMT
        Subj:   Two queries and an answer


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 16 Mar 1997 11:37:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0362 Qs: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362 Qs: Disguise

Simon,,

Disguise doesn't seem to work in Much Ado when Beatrice speaks
caustically to the  apparently disguised Benedick. The other women also
seem to see through the disguises worn by the masquers.

Helen Ostovich
McMaster University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter L Groves <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:27:53 +0000
Subject: 8.0362  Qs: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Disguise

Romeo at the Capulets' ball is recognised by Tybalt, but I suppose he's
not strictly in disguise, only masked.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Adrian Kiernander <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:35:56 +1100 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Disguise

Gallathea and Phyllida in John Lyly's _Gallathea_ are both disguised
(unknown to each other) as boys, and in the course of their
conversations begin to suspect that all may not be what it seems. But
they don't actually see through the disguises until their fathers reveal
their real identities.


[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins  <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 97 10:34:00 GMT
Subject:        Two queries and an answer

a)      For Simon Morgan-Russell:  in John Ford's last play _The Lady's
Trial_ Benatzi visits his wife Levidolche in disguise.  She recognises
him but does not let on until the end of the play.

b)      I was reading _King Lear_ last night and was struck for the first
time by the phrase 'milk of Burgundy'.  The Arden editor glosses this as
something like 'pasture - the effect for the cause', but does anyone
know of any other comments?

c)      Wildly improbable as this may sound, I have a vague memory of reading
somewhere that inmates in Bedlam actually were made to jump off things
as a way of getting them to snap out of it.  Has anyone else ever come
across this, or has my subconscious gone off the rails here?

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

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