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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Disguise; Queries; Anecdotes
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0365.  Tuesday, 18 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Randall Martin <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:45:03 GMT-400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362  Q: Disguise

[2]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 14:57 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0363  Re: Disguise and Que

[3]     From:   Scott D. McVay <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 20:46:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries

[4]     From:   John Velz <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Mar 1997 03:20:11 +0200
        Subj:   Disguise

[5]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
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 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 15:52:28 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Randall Martin <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:45:03 GMT-400
Subject: 8.0362  Q: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362  Q: Disguise

Re: Simon Morgan-Russell's query about plays in which disguises fail.

A possible instance occurs in *Cambyses*  scene three, when Ambidexter
comes on 'like a gentleman' to meet Sisamnes the judge.  Ambidexter
manages to keep up his apparent disguise for only a couple of lines
before Sisamnes recognises him: 'What, Master Ambidexter, is it you?'

Randall Martin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 14:57 ET
Subject: Re: Disguise and Que
Comment:        SHK 8.0363  Re: Disguise and Que

The ladies in Love's Labours Lost are not taken in by the Muscovites,
though of course they've been tipped off by Lafew.  The situations in
_Rom_ and _Ado_ are interesting, because the maskings for those parties
are social conventions, predictable in ways that the disguises of Edgar
or Volpone or Viola are not. Disguise does work at the end of _Ado_,
when Claudio cannot discern Hero behind her mask, though it's not very
strenuously tested.

Undisguisedly,
Dave Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott D. McVay <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 20:46:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries

In a message dated 97-03-17 10:08:31 EST,  Lisa Hopkins
 <
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 > writes:

<< b)      I was reading _King Lear_ last night and was struck for the
first time by the phrase 'milk of Burgundy'.  The Arden editor glosses
this as something like 'pasture - the effect for the cause', but does
anyone know of any other comments? >>

I have The Complete Signet Classic Shakespeare (1972), with a trans. of
King Lear by Russell Fraser (U of Michigan).  His note on I.i.84 -- "The
vines of France and milk of Burgundy" is: "milk i.e., pastures."
Wouldn't Lear just be categorizing France and Burgundy by their
stereotypical agricultural products?

Scott D. McVay (
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 )

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Mar 1997 03:20:11 +0200
Subject:        Disguise

To Simon Russell-Morgan

When it doesn't work, the roof comes off the theatre.  Just watch em
howl when Malvolio tries on his crossed garters and yellow stockings for
Olivia.  Note also in that play that Viola's disguise nearly falls apart
when she is required to fight a duel with Sir Andrew.  Audiences howl at
that one too.

The ladies in LLL penetrate the disguises of the visiting Russians and
then when they themselves switch identities, the men are befuddled.  In
Much Ado disguises at the ball are easily penetrated, but serve complex
purposes even when penetrated.

There is surely more.

Cheers,
J.V.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 15:52:28 -0500
Subject: 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted

Someone at Stratford Ont. swore to me that was true. One fine evening
the second priest at Ophelia's graveside walked up the hem of his robe,
fell into the trap and knocked himself out cold. He did  not emerge.
Hamlet leapt in and out of the now very crowded grave with Laertes. The
monk still did not emerge. Finally the scene ended, they closed the trap
and 'buried' the monk with Ophelia.

Mary Jane Miller,
Brock University,
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From: "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Subject: Re: Disguise; Queries;  Anecdotes
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The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0365.  Tuesday, 18 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Randall Martin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:45:03 GMT-400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362  Q: Disguise

[2]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 14:57 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0363  Re: Disguise and Que

[3]     From:   Scott D. McVay <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 20:46:43 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries

[4]     From:   John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Mar 1997 03:20:11 +0200
        Subj:   Disguise

[5]     From:   Mary Jane Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 15:52:28 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Randall Martin <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 11:45:03 GMT-400
Subject: 8.0362  Q: Disguise
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362  Q: Disguise

Re: Simon Morgan-Russell's query about plays in which disguises fail.

A possible instance occurs in *Cambyses*  scene three, when Ambidexter
comes on 'like a gentleman' to meet Sisamnes the judge.  Ambidexter
manages to keep up his apparent disguise for only a couple of lines
before Sisamnes recognises him: 'What, Master Ambidexter, is it you?'

Randall Martin

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 14:57 ET
Subject: Re: Disguise and Que
Comment:        SHK 8.0363  Re: Disguise and Que

The ladies in Love's Labours Lost are not taken in by the Muscovites,
though of course they've been tipped off by Lafew.  The situations in
_Rom_ and _Ado_ are interesting, because the maskings for those parties
are social conventions, predictable in ways that the disguises of Edgar
or Volpone or Viola are not. Disguise does work at the end of _Ado_,
when Claudio cannot discern Hero behind her mask, though it's not very
strenuously tested.

Undisguisedly,
Dave Evett

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott D. McVay <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 20:46:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0363 Re: Disguise and Queries

In a message dated 97-03-17 10:08:31 EST,  Lisa Hopkins
 <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 > writes:

<< b)      I was reading _King Lear_ last night and was struck for the
first time by the phrase 'milk of Burgundy'.  The Arden editor glosses
this as something like 'pasture - the effect for the cause', but does
anyone know of any other comments? >>

I have The Complete Signet Classic Shakespeare (1972), with a trans. of
King Lear by Russell Fraser (U of Michigan).  His note on I.i.84 -- "The
vines of France and milk of Burgundy" is: "milk i.e., pastures."
Wouldn't Lear just be categorizing France and Burgundy by their
stereotypical agricultural products?

Scott D. McVay (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 )

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 18 Mar 1997 03:20:11 +0200
Subject:        Disguise

To Simon Russell-Morgan

When it doesn't work, the roof comes off the theatre.  Just watch em
howl when Malvolio tries on his crossed garters and yellow stockings for
Olivia.  Note also in that play that Viola's disguise nearly falls apart
when she is required to fight a duel with Sir Andrew.  Audiences howl at
that one too.

The ladies in LLL penetrate the disguises of the visiting Russians and
then when they themselves switch identities, the men are befuddled.  In
Much Ado disguises at the ball are easily penetrated, but serve complex
purposes even when penetrated.

There is surely more.

Cheers,
J.V.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Jane Miller <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 15:52:28 -0500
Subject: 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0351  Re: Romeo and Juliet Assorted

Someone at Stratford Ont. swore to me that was true. One fine evening
the second priest at Ophelia's graveside walked up the hem of his robe,
fell into the trap and knocked himself out cold. He did  not emerge.
Hamlet leapt in and out of the now very crowded grave with Laertes. The
monk still did not emerge. Finally the scene ended, they closed the trap
and 'buried' the monk with Ophelia.

Mary Jane Miller,
Brock University,
 

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