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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Polonius; Fear of Flying
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0367.  Tuesday, 18 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Albert Misseldine <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 09:41:54 -0500
        Subj:   Polonius

[2]     From:   Ed Peschko <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 10:43:12 -0700 (MST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Shakespeare and London

[3]     From:   Daniel Lowenstein <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Mar 1997 18:43:27 PST
        Subj:   London


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 09:41:54 -0500
Subject:        Polonius

Concerning Polonius: wouldn't the audience have recognized the movement
of "He closes with you in this consequence: 'Good sir' or so, or
'friend,' or 'gentleman' - and laughed? Compare "and he himself must
speak ...saying 'ladies' or 'fair ladies - I would wish you' or 'I would
entreat you.' And if we laugh at Polonius, where is the dignity?

Cheers.
A Misseldine

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Peschko <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 10:43:12 -0700 (MST)
Subject: 8.0362  Qs: Shakespeare and London
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0362  Qs: Shakespeare and London

I would weigh your passion against your fear - if you value your passion
more than your fear then hell-GET ON THE PLANE!

If you value your fear more than your passion, then don't.

But before I would make the latter assessment, I would think of not only
the present cost but the future cost: now, you don't get to learn about
Shakespeare.  Next, you don't get to go to Ancient Greece. Forget the
pyramids, or Babylon, China, or any of the wonders of the world.

I'd say that the choice pretty much makes itself. Just close your eyes
and think calm thoughts when you get on that plane.. I had much the same
problem, and I overcame it. You can as well.

Ed

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Lowenstein <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Mar 1997 18:43:27 PST
Subject:        London

Fear of flying is not the same as fear of death, so I doubt if lines
from Shakespeare will be of much help to Ms. Koskinen.  I suppose being
afraid of flying is somewhat wimpish, but I don't see why you should be
ashamed.  You are not doing anything wrong or harmful to anyone else.
John Madden, a successful football broadcaster, refuses to fly.

Flying is efficient and safe, but it is also quite unpleasant.  Why not
make a virtue of your aversion?  Are there no longer accommodations for
passengers on freighters?  That used to be an exceedingly pleasant way
to travel.

Best,
Dan Lowenstein
 

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