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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Re: Disguise; Anecdotes
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0370.  Wednesday, 19 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Lisa Hopkins <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 18 Mar 97 16:21:00 GMT
        Subj:   Disguise

[2]     From:   Mark Mann <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Mar 1997 00:44:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0365 Re: Anecdotes


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lisa Hopkins <
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Date:           Tuesday, 18 Mar 97 16:21:00 GMT
Subject:        Disguise

And how about 'Here comes the lord Lysimachus disguised' in _Pericles_.

Lisa Hopkins
Sheffield Hallam University

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[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Mann <
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Date:           Wednesday, 19 Mar 1997 00:44:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0365 Re: Anecdotes
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0365 Re: Anecdotes

<< Someone at Stratford Ont. swore to me that was true. One fine evening
the second priest at Ophelia's graveside walked up the hem of his robe,
fell into the trap and knocked himself out cold. He did  not emerge.
Hamlet leapt in and out of the now very crowded grave with Laertes. The
monk still did not emerge. Finally the scene ended, they closed the trap
and 'buried' the monk with Ophelia.

 Mary Jane Miller,
 Brock University, >>

Hilarious!! I heard one having to do with the same scene...a friend
swears she saw this..Hamlet, played by a rather short actor, fell into
the grave, which was deeper than he was tall. A moment passes, one of
those three hours moments, then the audience sees a head pop up as
Hamlet begins leaping repeatedly to deliver his line:" It is ... (leap)
... I ... (leap) ... Hamlet ......... (leap) .... The Dane!"No report
follows as to how they disinterred" him...Cheers....Mark Mann, Arden
Shakespeare Company
 

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