Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: March ::
Qs: Poet in JC; Hamlet's Misogyny: Lr. Video
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0391.  Thursday, 27 March 1997.

[1]     From:   C. David Frankel <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 17:10:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   The Poet in Julius Caesar

[2]     From:   Don R. Hamersley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 18:06:08 -0800
        Subj:   Non-Freudian Reasons for Hamlet

[3]     From:   Skip Nicholson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 20:43:11 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Lear Video


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 17:10:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        The Poet in Julius Caesar

In Act IV, scene iii of JC, while Brutus and Cassius are arguing in the
tent, a character identified as POET in my text (and I assume the Folio)
enters, makes an attempt to stop the argument, and is shooed away by
both Cassius and Brutus (hence achieving, though not quite in the way he
intended, his goal).

I have two questions:  1) since the character is not called a poet in
the text (except, possibly, for Cassius's caustic comment "How vilely
doth this cynic rhyme"), would the Elizabethan audience have known he
was a poet-was there, for example, a conventional costume?

2) Is there any larger reason, do you think, for this little snippet's
existence beyond the practical need to have *something* serve as a
stimulus for Cassius and Brutus to end their argument?

Thanks.
cdf

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don R. Hamersley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 18:06:08 -0800
Subject:        Non-Freudian Reasons for Hamlet

I have just done a short paper on Laurence Olivier's 1948 "Hamlet" and
the Freudian/Oedipal approach to interpreting the play.  Without opening
a huge can of worms on the topic (if that is possible with "Hamlet"), I
am in search of some more non-Freudian explanations of Hamlet's apparent
misogyny.

Perhaps a large source of it is Hamlet's frustration over his inability
to share with the 2 women in his life, Gertrude and Ophelia, his
suspicions of Claudius both before the arrival of the ghost ("O my
prophetic soul!" (1.5))  and after.  In contrast, Hamlet seems to have
no problem identifying with Horatio (1.2.161: "Horatio-or I do forget
myself") and confiding in him, but he cannot say a word to either
Ophelia or Gertrude.  This does NOT mean that he easily trusts all men
either, as we see him drive Marcellus to distraction with his demands
for an oath (Mar: "but my lord we have sworn already!")

Indeed, from the point of view that I suggest above, it seems to make
more sense that the turning point in Hamlet's relationship with Ophelia
occurs right AFTER he appears to her all disheveled after the ghost's
visit.  Maybe he went to her to confide in her and then determined that
he could not (thinking that she might give his secret away-"Frailty, thy
name is woman").  Certainly, their relationship goes straight downhill
from this point forward...

Seen from this view-i.e., that Hamlet is disappointed only in the 2
particular women nearest to him-perhaps Hamlet is not a misogynist at
all.  He seems to talk to Rosen. & Guild. about women like an excited
schoolboy (2.2.225 and "man delights not me" soon after) upon their
arrival.  And he is not shy or disgusted about sexual and "country"
matters talking to Ophelia in 3.2.  So maybe he is just upset with the 2
women in his life who have let him down.  And besides, others in the
play use phrases like "Frailty, thy name is woman," as does Claudius in
1.2 telling Hamlet in front of all the courtiers that he is acting like
a woman ('tis unmanly grief).

Any thoughts on this, smaller than a thesis or a byte-sized breadbox,
would be appreciated...

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Mar 1997 20:43:11 -0800
Subject:        Re: Lear Video

Does anyone know if a video exists of the old (mid-70s?) TV production
of King Lear with James Earl Jones? I think Joseph Papp did it, and I
want to say that Raul Julia played "one of the 'E' guys."

Much obliged for any leads...
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.