1997

Re: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0296.  Saturday, 1 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Mark Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 11:39:56 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

[2]     From:   Anna Karvellas  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:03:41 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

[3]     From:   Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:51:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mark Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 11:39:56 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

Re the CD-ROM associated with the Norton.  It is terrific: there's
nothing like it on the scene.  I know since I'm editing it.  (No bias
here.)  The CD-ROM focuses on six plays: Merchant, 1 Hen 4, Dream,
Hamlet, Othello, Tempest.  In addition to texts of the plays, of course,
it has key selections which are acted out by a London group, also film
and audio clips, and the passages are gateways into an inventory of
topical discussions-eg. "What does Titania look like?" : conceptions of
fairies from early modern to present, with images natch-and exemplary
descriptions of productions from Restoration to present including
descriptions of operatic adaptations, etc, plus stuff on sources.  It's
a LOT of fun and a great learning tool for students.

How to get it.  The MND section is going to be bundled in with each copy
of the Norton Sh. as a freebie (I believe).  The full CD-ROM will be
available in September and will cost $15 if ordered with the Norton
Shakespeare  $30 as a standalone.  It may be possible to sample the MND
section in advance: not sure.  I will query Norton and post to this list
if I have more info.  Anyone interested is also welcome to email me
directly.

With no bias or self-interest at all,
Mark Rose

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Karvellas  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:03:41 -0500
Subject: 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

I, too, am glad to hear of the interest in the Norton Shakespeare
Workshop CD-ROM. We are indeed including a free copy of the CD-ROM demo
(it focuses on _A Midsummer Night's Dream_) in all books sampled to
professors. We will begin to ship at the end of next month. If you
aren't already online to be sent a copy, contact your local Norton
representative or email me (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and I'll forward
your request to the representative. More ordering information and
samples of CD-ROM are available on our web site:

www.wwnorton.com/college/english/shakespeare/cdrom.htm

You can also access from the this site the "Teaching with the Norton
Shakespeare CD-ROM" forum. It just went up yesterday.

Let me know if I can be of any additional help.

Anna Karvellas
W. W. Norton

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard A Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:51:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0291  Qs: Norton Ed. CD-ROM

A sales rep who visited me recently (named Mathew Arnold, oddly enough)
told me that the Norton will be available for purchase as of late march
(at the time of the SAA) and that one may buy it solely as a text or as
a
text with a CD-Rom.  (I think that there is a CD-Rom for students adn
one
for teachers as well).

Best,
Richard

Re: Ideology

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0295.  Saturday, 1 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 10:29:03 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0284  RE: Ideology

[2]     From:   Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 97 13:49:00 CST
        Subj:   Ideology Revisited

[3]     From:   Lee Gibson  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 97 13:42 CST
        Subj:   Re: Ideology


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 10:29:03 -0800
Subject: 8.0284  RE: Ideology
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0284  RE: Ideology

> But you don't let them set the exam paper, do you? They can't really
> "decide for themselves" but only choose from a range of permitted
> positions. Or would you let candidates in a Shakespeare exam decide for
> themselves that there is nothing worth commenting on in any Shakespeare
> text?

One assumes that students who felt that there was nothing worth
commenting on would not sign up for the course.  Of course, they could
also write a fervently brilliant paper, defending literalism, if they so
chose.  Even to say that "there is nothing worth commenting on" would be
to comment.

As for whether students can set the final exam, I always derive
examination questions from matters that have been discussed in class.
While I do have some control over class discussion, it is hardly
absolute.  I would even say that all teaching, even lecturing, is a sort
of dialectic between my concerns and those of my students, in which
their responses condition me as much as mine conditions them.  Unless
one is to take the humanist position (or, to save argument, what some on
this list choose to term "humanist" position) that as a teacher, one is
an absolutely free individual, then the students do, in part, set the
exam.  Alternatively, I suppose, one could take the fascist position
that only I am in a position to tell others what they ought to think,
but I rather doubt that either you or Paul would take such a position.

Of course, I can't speak for how Paul teaches.

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 97 13:49:00 CST
Subject:        Ideology Revisited

I have been pondering the whole issue of transcendence, and a few
belated thoughts have occurred to me.  Could Shakespeare's
"transcendence" be due in large part to the fact that he is the perfect
product of the English Renaissance educational system?  Grammar school
encouraged boys to see language as an infinitely malleable sophistic
tool, and the cleverest writers (and therefore most manly men, if you
believe Walter Ong and Richard Lanham)  were those that could produce
poetry that meant as many things at once as possible - double entendre
taken to its most artistic (and sophisticated, if you'll excuse the pun)
level.

This would mean that Shakespeare's transcendence comes not from the
universality of the ideas represented in the plays, but instead from
their "re-interpretability."  They can be virtually whatever we most
want them to be.  Witness the huge variations from production to
production.

Any thoughts on this?

Lysbeth Em Benkert
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lee Gibson  <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 97 13:42 CST
Subject:        Re: Ideology

Gabriel Egan's crack that Shakespeare's plays are nothing more than
"grist for the scholar's mill" embodies a peculiarly characteristic
trait of the solipsistic Postmodern Mind:  its complete and total
disregard for anything outside itself.  Shakespeare's plays, first,
last, in between, and foremost, are for audiences to attend.  Period.
Anything else is, at best, a second order epiphenomenon.

Lee Gibson
Department of English
Southern Methodist University

Re: Facsimiles

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0294.  Saturday, 1 March 1997.

[1]     From:   Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 10:16:56 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0283  Qs: Facsimiles

[2]     From:   Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:39:11 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0283 Qs: Facsimiles


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean K. Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 10:16:56 -0800
Subject: 8.0283  Qs: Facsimiles
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0283  Qs: Facsimiles

> Is this Applause facsimile a good one? Is it 'diplomatic' or
> photographic?  Is it edited in any way?

My copy of the Applause facsimile was purchased direct from Book Stacks
Unlimited, of 200 Public Square, Suite 26-4600, Cleveland, Ohio,
44114-2301.  I understand that Applause has been threatened with legal
action by Norton and will not be shipping any more, but maybe Book
Stacks still has a few copies left.  They have a web page, by the way,
which I'm sure you can find using any decent search engine.  The surface
postage to Canada cost $7.50 (US), and the book itself ran to $45.00
(also US).

The edition is an ideal facsimile.  It's constructed photographically,
in other words, but using the best pages from the surviving 1623
copies.  There are no notes on the pages themselves, except for
through-line numbering (the subject of the legal dispute, I
understand).  There is a brief introductory essay.

I'm given to believe that various efforts are being made to fill this
gap, including a new Norton edition some time in the near future.

Cheers,
Sean.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Murphy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Feb 1997 15:39:11 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 8.0283 Qs: Facsimiles
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0283 Qs: Facsimiles

The applause facsimile was produced in the same way as Hinman's - using
an amalgam of pages from a selection of the Folger copies of F1. It has,
however, been withdrawn from circulation, I believe owing to problems
regarding the use of TLNs, which, seemingly, are owned by Norton. I know
of no other F1 facsimiles currently in print, though one or two F1 texts
were included in the Shakespearean Originals series. A full copy of F1
in facsimile is included in the electronic Arden though I presume that
if you can't manage a hundred quid for the Norton you could hardly
manage the best part of three grand for the Arden CD!.

Andrew

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