Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: April ::
Qs: Harbage; Formal Address; Suicide; Shall I;
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0396.  Tuesday, 1 April 1997.
 =

[1]     From:   Albert Misseldine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 11:04:47 -0500
        Subj:   [Q: Harbage]

[2]     From:   Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 97 14:43:00 CST
        Subj:   Formal Address

[3]     From:   Frank Whigham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 1997 16:55:36 -0600
        Subj:   Early Modern/Roman Suicide

[4]     From:   Gabriel Wasserman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Mar 1997 20:53:42 -0500
        Subj:   Speaking of "Shall I Die?"

[5]     From:   Gabriel Wasserman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 1997 20:18:39 -0500
        Subj:   Chas. Hamilton


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 27 Mar 1997 11:04:47 -0500
Subject:        [Q: Harbage]

I'm leaving this highly enjoyable chat line soon, but before I do I
would dearly love to hear what you-all think of Alfred Harbage's ideas
in his book As They Liked It - specifically the
Shakespeare-as-moral-but-not-a-moralist idea, and his view of dramatic
art as a "highroad leading nowhere." I confess I am quite taken with his
stance.        =


Cheers. A Misseldine

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 97 14:43:00 CST
Subject:        Formal Address

When a play was performed on the 18th or 19th century stage, what would
have been the form of address used in the programs for the female
actors, and what, then, would have been the proper abbreviation?

Lysbeth Em Benkert
Northern State University

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Whigham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 1997 16:55:36 -0600
Subject:        Early Modern/Roman Suicide

Can anyone help with recommendations for the best secondary sources on
early modern English appropriations/adaptations of the Roman ethic of
honorable suicide?

Many thanks.
Frank Whigham

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Wasserman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 29 Mar 1997 20:53:42 -0500
Subject:        Speaking of "Shall I Die?"

Well, I am interested in the fact that, um, well, y'know, um, a-COUGH,
COUGH, the fact that Don Foster's SHAXICON catalogues "Shall I Die?" =

After all, didn't he write a long article in rebuttal of that?  Speaking
of "Shall I Die?", what about
     the "Will"
     *The Second Mayden's Trag=9Cdy*  (Doesn't anie-one haue reespect for=

th' dead)
     *Edmund Ironside*
     *Leir*
     *die Breschafte Brudermond*  (Fratricide Punished)
     Q1 *Hamlet*
[Though I know he's done|Q1 *Merry Wives* |it, I include it for sake of
completeness] =

[Though I know he's done|Q1 *2H6*              |it, I include it for
sake of completeness]
[Though I know he's done|O1 *3H6*              |it, I include it for
sake of completeness]
[Though I know he's done|Q1 *H5*                |it, I include it for
sake of completeness]
[Though I know he's done|   *E3*                   |it, I include it for
sake of completeness]
[Though I know he's done| *Double Falsehood* |it, I include it for sake
o completeness]
     *A Yorkshire Trag=9Cdy*
     *Sir Thomas More*, hand D
     *The Famous Victories of Henrie the Fifth*
     *The Troublesome Raigne of Kinge John*  (parts 1 and 2)
[Though I know he's done it| *Taming of A Shrew* | I include it for sake
of completeness]
     *The True Trag=9Cdy of kinge Richard 3*
[Though I obviously know   |*Funeral Elegy* |he's done it, I include it
for sake completeness]
     *Locrine*
ET CETERA {O, please pronounce that "et KEH-teh-rah" as it is pronounced
in proper Latin

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Wasserman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 1997 20:18:39 -0500
Subject:        Chas. Hamilton

Today, I read Charles Hamilton's *In Search of Shakespeare*.  (You
know...I had a bitte of free time...I decided to read some good
fiction...)  I figured that Hamilton's complete list of things (besides
signatures) in Shakespeare's handwriting is:

(1) The Will(He's probably right about this one)
(2) Sir Thomas More, Hand D(")
(3) The several drafts of the papers for the Coat of Arms, including the
pictures
(4) The legal papers for something or other, I forget what
(5) Annotations in Holinshed's Chronicles
(6) Annotations in something else
(7) The Langleat page, including the picture=87
(8) The Northumberland manuscript  (cover, a few pages of text, and
annotations)

To which we may add, though they're not mentioned in the book

(9) Annotations is Edward Halle's *Union of the Two Noble Houses of York
and Lancaster* (I think I read somewhere that Hamilton believes that
Shakespeare wrote them)
(10) The Second Mayden's Tragedy  (He wrote a whole book about it)
(11) Edmund Ironside (E. Sams mentions that Hamilton says that it's in
Shakespeare's hand.

He believes the picture of the bearded guy on the right to be a
Shakespearean self-portrait.

But why am I playing you with this?  I must have a point to make.  That
point is to ask you:
    =

 What doe yoo thinke of ye Northumberland manuscript.

m not taken in by Hamilton's Shenanigans.  Reading the book was
excruciating, but it =

was fun.  (Is that an oxymoron?  [I mean "excruciating fun".])

I guess to please everyone, a COMPLETE edition of Shakespeare should
include:

Commendatory Poems and Prefaces, 1599-1640
COMEDIES
All's Well That Ends Well =

As You Like It =

The Two Gentlemen of Verona =

The Comedy of Errors
The Taming of  a  Shrew
The Taming of the Shrew
Love's Labour's Lost =

A Midsummer Night's Dream
The Merry Wives of Windsor (Quarto) =

The Merry Wives of Windsor (Folio)
Measure for Measure
Much Ado About Nothing
Twelfth Night, or What You Will
Fair Em
Locrine =

TRAGEDIES
Macbeth
Hamlet  (Fratricide Punished)
Hamlet  (First  Quarto)
Hamlet  (Second Quarto [and folio])
Othello
King Leir
King Lear (Quarto)
King Lear (Folio)
Julius Caesar =

Romeo and Juliet (First quarto)
Romeo and Juliet (Second Quarto [and folio])
Titus Andronicus
Timon of Athens =

Coriolanus
Antony and Cleopatra
HISTORIES
Edmund Ironside =

The Troublesome Reign of King John, Parts 1 and 2
The Life of King John
The Reign of King Edward the Third
Richard the Third
Henry the Fourth, Part 1
Henry the Fourth, Part 2
The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth
Henry the Fifth (Quarto)
Henry the Fifth (Folio)
Henry the Sixth, Part 1
The Contention Between the Houses...
Henry the Sixth, Part 2
Richard, Duke of York
Henry the Sixth, Part 3
The True Tragedy of Richard the Third
Richard the Third
Sir Thomas More, Hand D
Henry the Eighth
ROMANCES
Pericles
Cymbeline
The Tempest
The Winter's Tale
The Two Noble Kinsmen
The Second Maiden's Tragedy
POEMS
Sonnets
A Lover's Complaint
Venus and Adonis
The Rape of Lucrece
Various Poems, including:
  A Song (Shall I Die)
  The Phoenix and Turtle
  The Passionate Pilgrim =

  Epitaphs, including:
   Upon a Pair of Gloves =

   Upon the King
   Upon John Combe =

   Upon Ben Jonson =

   Upon Himself =

   Upon the Stanley Tomb =

   The Funeral Elegy =

MISCELANNEOUS
Will
Northumberland manuscript
The Langleat Page (with picture)
All the drafts for the coat of Arms
Annotations in Holinshed
Annotations in Halle
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.