Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: April ::
Re: Richard 3
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0399.  Tuesday, 1 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Kathleen Kendrick <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Mar 1997 15:27:04 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0339 Qs: Richard 3

[2]     From:   JoAnna Koskinen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 30 Mar 1997 20:54:59 -0800
        Subj:   Cowardice as a Facade


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathleen Kendrick <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 29 Mar 1997 15:27:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.0339 Qs: Richard 3
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0339 Qs: Richard 3

JoAnne - I hate to disagree so vehemently with you but I must.  Look up
Frued's *The Complete Psychological Works* Vol. XIV - "The Exceptions"
and I think you'll change your mind.  Pollard refers to Freud's
"Exceptions" as well.  " ... Richard III .... projection of the
character's grievance into the world in the form of various kinds of
disfiguring action." Richard, I think, was a product of the war times,
an aggressive father and a mother who thought Richard "tetchy and
wayward was thy infancy; Thy schooldays frightful ... " vile as well as
a younger son with nothing to look forward to.  He was "foresworn"  in
his mother's womb.  Also read Richard's beginning in 3 Henry VI which
clarifies his status as deformed, younger son and sibling jealousy of
Edward.  Richard knew that only Richard loved Richard.  I could go on
but won't.  Thanks for letting me vent.

Kitty Kendrick

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JoAnna Koskinen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 30 Mar 1997 20:54:59 -0800
Subject:        Cowardice as a Facade

Dear Jason,

I am very interested in your analysis of Richard III. Please give more
detail as to why you see his evil as a sign of  cowardice, along with
how you define "dark" in this case. As a TA in an Intro to Shakespeare
class this semester, Richard III was one of the plays we did, and I
would very much like to hear some other approaches.

By the way, if I haven't said to each of you individually, let me say
publicly that I truly appreciated your input on Richard III as well as
my fear of flying episode. I am dealing with the flying issue (I'm going
to London this summer), but if you recall, my fellow is an actor, and I
am having some problems with his arrogance and ego. It would appear that
ever since the presentation, he has been a little "chilly," and made it
a point to throw a dig at me last week.

It's really too bad-I very much wanted to dialogue with an actor on
Shakespeare. However, I choose not to conclude that every Shakespearean
actor is pretentiousness and affected. I met quite a few at the LA
conference last year, and they were kind and more than open to
conversation.  Either way, I've decided not to let this dampen my first
experience in teaching Shakespeare.

Onward to the next play, which is King Lear!

JoAnna
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.