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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: April ::
Re: Polonius's Advise; Poet in JC
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0401.  Tuesday, 1 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Mike Sirofchuck <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 1997 04:29:10 -0900
        Subj:   Polonius's Advice Speech

[2]     From:   C. David Frankel <
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        Date:   Monday, 31 Mar 1997 21:13:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0395  Re: Poet in JC

[3]     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 1 Apr 1997 02:18:10 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0395 Re: Poet in JC


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Sirofchuck <
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Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 1997 04:29:10 -0900
Subject:        Polonius's Advice Speech

These lines from Siddhartha present some insight into interpreting
Polonius's advice speech; Sid is speaking to his buddy, Govinda in the
chapter, "Govinda":

"Wisdom is not communicable.  The wisdom which a wise man tries to
communicate always sounds foolish. . . . Knowledge can be communicated,
but not wisdom.  One can find it, live it, be fortified by it, do
wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it." If the
advice is sound, but sounds foolish, Sid has perhaps explained why.

Mike S

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           C. David Frankel <
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Date:           Monday, 31 Mar 1997 21:13:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0395  Re: Poet in JC
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0395  Re: Poet in JC

Thanks to Norm Holland for his insights into the poet in the tent scene
in JC.  Along those lines-and purely speculatively and for fun-I wonder
if Shakespeare played the part?

cdf

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
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Date:           Tuesday, 1 Apr 1997 02:18:10 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.0395 Re: Poet in JC
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0395 Re: Poet in JC

Thank you Norm Holland for the reading of what happens to the "poet" in
JC. I don't find it at all perverse. For a useful, and somewhat more
cynical (as regards the role and name "poet"), complement to NH's
reading, one may consider Rene Girard's in his THEATRE OF ENVY (Girard
also points out that all the examples that Philostrate suggests and
which Theseus rejects for entertainment in lieu of PYRAMUS AND THISBE
involve a similar disfiguring of the poet). My own sense of the
significance would build upon Holland's and Girard's and suggest that
the conception of the poet as "he who can unite body and soul" or other
such antinomies that must appear differentiated in order for there to be
DRAMA was conceived of, by the dramatist, as too reductive of a
representation-the poet doesn't really die in Shakespeare's plays, just
dies AS POET..... Chris Stroffolino (freshly returned from my first
experience at an SAA conference, it was a pleasure to meet y'all).
 

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