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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: April ::
Re: Religious Biases; Currency; Pericles; Monkeys
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0447.  Friday, 11 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Kathryn M. Moncrief <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 17:06:42 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Religious Biases

[2]     From:   James Marino <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 11:38:56 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0437  Qs: Elizabethan Currency

[3]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
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        Date:   Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 14:55:00 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0436 Questions with Editor's Notes Attached

[4]     From:   Pervez Rizvi <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Apr 1997 09:41:39 +0100
        Subj:   Monkeys


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathryn M. Moncrief <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 17:06:42 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Religious Biases

In reply to Hilary Zunin's question about Shakespeare and religion, I
urge you to check out Huston Diehl's terrific new book *Staging Reform,
Reforming the Stage:  Protestantism and Popular Theater in Early Modern
England* that is just available from Cornell UP.  Diehl analyzes
tragedies by Kyd, Marlowe, Middleton, Webster, and Shakespeare and
argues that Elizabethan and Jacobean drama is "both a product of the
Protestant Reformation-a reformed drama-and a producer of Protestant
habits of thought-a reforming drama."  I especially like her careful
examination of the religious controversies and what relationship they
have to the stage.  She makes clear the differences, conflicts and
ruptures within Protestantism; how the dramas appropriate the rhetoric
of Protestantism; and how they rehearse the stresses and changes wrought
by the Reformation.  You mentioned a particular interest in *Hamlet*:
Check out chapter 5, "Censoring the Imaginary:  The Wittenberg
Tragedies."

Kathryn M. Moncrief
Dept. of English
U of Iowa

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Marino <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 11:38:56 -0600
Subject: 8.0437  Qs: Elizabethan Currency
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0437  Qs: Elizabethan Currency

Alfred Harbage, Shakespeare's Audience, contains a conversion table on
p.  59.  if that's not near to  hand, Andrew Gurr supplies some
equivalents on pp. 197-199 of the handy text The Shakespearean Stage,
1574-1642.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
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Date:           Thursday, 10 Apr 1997 14:55:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0436 Questions with Editor's Notes Attached
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0436 Questions with Editor's Notes Attached

I saw a production of Pericles in London which did exactly what you are
proposing; kept Glower "onstage" but in the first row of the audience.
Thus his later comments seemed to emerge from the spectators themselves.
I recall it as being very effective (however, it was a very intimate
theater).

Annalisa Castaldo
Temple University

[4]----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pervez Rizvi <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Apr 1997 09:41:39 +0100
Subject:        Monkeys

I'd like to share the following observation, attributed to Prof. Robert
Wilensky of the University of California at Berkeley:

"We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters
will eventually reproduce the works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the
Internet, we know this is not true."
 

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