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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: April ::
Re: Teaching AWW
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0462.  Monday, 14 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Susan Mather <
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        Date:   Saturday, 12 Apr 1997 13:13:35 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0456  Teaching AWW

[2]     From:   Ed Peschko <
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        Date:   Sunday, 13 Apr 1997 10:50:07 -0600 (MDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0456  Teaching AWW


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Susan Mather <
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Date:           Saturday, 12 Apr 1997 13:13:35 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0456  Teaching AWW
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0456  Teaching AWW

To Julie Bleha--

Just a question-Are you thinking about framing your discussion of Comedy
around Aristotle?  One of my former professors, Dr. Paskoff, did that
and was quite successful. I haven't forgotten how "tragic" comedy can
be.  The storyline for most comedies could easily be tragedies. I wish
you luck.  It sounds like you're going to have a good time!  Take Care,
Susan Mather

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ed Peschko <
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Date:           Sunday, 13 Apr 1997 10:50:07 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: 8.0456  Teaching AWW
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0456  Teaching AWW

Well... from my experience as a 17 year old, in English (8 years ago), I
remember that (of the two plays) Much Ado About Nothing resounded a
*lot* better than a Midsummer's Night Dream or As You Like It.

I don't know... I just think that it takes a much more mature outlook to
enjoy these two plays.

> >My question to the list is this:  has anybody taught All's Well to a  younger group of students, and if so, what was your experience?  I originally was thinking of LLL, but found that too daunting a prospect to consider.....<<

How about Twelfth Night? There's a wonderful BBC production I loved when
I first saw it at 19... It seems to grow with age, too.

Just my 2 pence... heed or ignore at will.

Ed
 

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