1997

Birthday Greetings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0492.  Wednesday, 23 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Karen Krebser <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 1997 10:26:15 -0700
        Subj:   St. George's Day

[2]     From:   Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, April 23, 1997
        Subj:   Happy Birthday


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Krebser <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Apr 1997 10:26:15 -0700
Subject:        St. George's Day

Thinking fondly of the gentle, brilliant man without whom none of us
would be here. Born (or perhaps baptized) on this day, died on this day.

        Sonnet LXXXI

       Or I shall live your epitaph to make,
       Or you survive when I in earth am rotten;
       From hence your memory death cannot take,
       Although in me each part will be forgotten.
       Your name from hence immortal life shall have,
       Though I, once gone, to all the world must die:
       The earth can yield me but a common grave,
       When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie.
       Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
       Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read,
       And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
       When all the breathers of this world are dead;
       You still shall live--such virtue hath my pen--
       Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.

Karen Krebser

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, April 23, 1997
Subject:        Happy Birthday

Heaven and earth.  Must I remember?  Today is Shakespeare's birthday.
As His vicar here on earth I send all SHAKSPERans His best wishes and
mine. Another thing to remember.  I am still seeking Associates to the
Shakespeare Data Bank.  Select  a scholarly, popular, or whatever theme,
topic, subject, angle, your pet project, etc, or write for one. I will
send instructions.    A computerized plaque will be entered at the head
of your contribution when we go on line.  Everyone will learn from
everyone else.  Knowledge is power.  Knowledge brings  wisdom.  There is
no sin but ignorance.  'tis not folly to be wise.   lou marder
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  Or CompuServe 76411.3613
[If you would rather celebrate S's birthday on May  3 (in the Gregorian
calendar), that is ok with me too.]   Rememberrrrrrrrrrr me....  and the
SDB.  Thanks.

Q: Nunn's *Othello*

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0491.  Wednesday, 23 April 1997.

From:           John Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 19:27:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Othello

I'm trying to find a video for my college library of Trevor Nunn's
*Othello*, in which Ian McKellen plays Iago.  Any suggestions of where
it can be purchased?

John Cox
Hope College

Re: Ideology

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0489.  Wednesday, 23 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Thomas Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 12:16:55 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0487  Re: Ideology

[2]     From:   Paul Hawkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 12:53:53 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Ideology

[3]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 23:13:33 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Ideology


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 12:16:55 -0500
Subject: 8.0487  Re: Ideology
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0487  Re: Ideology

I have another non-rhetorical question about ideology.  If I understand
correctly, one version of an argument about ideology runs that it
pervades the entire structure of cognition, from deliberate political
commitments, through half-glimpsed assumptions and unacknowledged
structures of feeling, all the way down to the most basic foundations of
one's orientation in the world as a functioning being. I think Gabriel
Egan was arguing something like this position a while ago.

At some point in this descent to the more and more basic, ideology as a
system of organizing information ought to encounter the biological and
Darwinian apparatus of the brain, which, as neurobiologists and
evolutionary theorists can show, is a highly structured system designed
to facilitate the survival and reproductive success of the organism that
owns it. One of the faculties structured at least in part by Darwinian
processes in the brain (as several important theorists have argued) is
language, for which certain universal properties can be traced (such as
childhood acquisition). My question concerns the intersection between
ideology and biology at this very basic level, one that seems, for all
the reading I can do, not to have been addressed by any theorist.  Do
"deep" ideology theorists posit an absolute gap between the biology of
language function in the brain and the formation of ideological
commitments to concepts like "self as individual", a concept with
potentially powerful Darwinian resonances? Or is there some complex
anastomosis between these two sets of structuring pressures? What are
the consequences for a philosophical materialism of embracing either of
these positions?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Hawkins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 12:53:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Ideology

I was interested to read in the second paragraph of Stephen Greenblatt's
General Introduction to the Norton Shakespeare the astonishing
post-modern advice that, "The starting point, and perhaps the ending
point as well, in any encounter with Shakespeare is simply to enjoy him,
to savor his imaginative richness, to take pleasure in his infinite
delight in language."

Since Greenblatt does not add, "except for anything in the canon that
our betters would not have us enjoy-by no means enjoy those things,"
does his advice make Terence Hawkes or any other list members squirm?

Paul Hawkins

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 23:13:33 GMT
Subject:        Re: Ideology

It's entirely possible Robert Appelbaum is joking and I don't get it,
but assuming not...

> ...it doesn't seem to me that "changing one's mind"
> is exactly the point. Of course, Gabriel Egan
> would probably find a way of arguing that "changing
> one's mind" is either impossible, tautological, or
> delusional-in any case, an ideological "effect."

Quite the opposite. Since the one essence the anti-essentialist Marxist
believes in is conflict and its by-products, meaning and social change,
changing minds is entirely the point.

> But what I mean is that the sheer act of arguing ideas
> the way Egan and the others have done has changed the
> ideas themselves....I suppose I am still subject to the
> same  predispositions on the subject of Shakespeare and
> ideology as I ever was.

The conviction that one's consciousness is a stable rock in a sea of
shifting meanings is, indeed, an ideological effect. Capitalism's denial
of all social intercourse other than the cash-nexus extends into
language, which rather than being a social phenomenon which constitutes
individuals on the basis of their (albeit incomplete) sense of shared
experience, becomes the swirling sea between islands of consciousness.

For example:

> I have not been persuaded by anyone's argument to change
> my "mind"--but I do see different ways of getting engaged
> with the ideas in question if and when my mind feels
> called upon to enter into discourse about them.

'Discourse' means the active process of the generation of meaning in
acts of discussion, but is here used simply as though it were a synonym
for 'discussion'. The Marxist notion of 'meaning-in-process' is deformed
back into the old Romantic idea of 'meaning-in-self'. In this model, the
'mind' is not immersed in process (the conviction which usually makes
people emphasize 'discourse' over 'discussion') but rather can dip its
toes into those swirling seas "when [it] feels called upon to enter"
them.

Gabriel Egan

Re: Sir Thomas More; New Novel about Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0490.  Wednesday, 23 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Maria Concolato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 23:44:12 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0479  Qs: Sir Thomas More

[2]     From:   Virginia M. Byrne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 17:50:49 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0486 New Novel about Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Maria Concolato <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 23:44:12 +0200
Subject: 8.0479  Qs: Sir Thomas More
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0479  Qs: Sir Thomas More

In 1981 there was an Italian edition of 'The Book of Sir Thomas More' by
Vittorio Gabrieli and Giorgio Melchiori (Bari,Adriatica editrice), which
was translated into English some years later.In the introduction, the
various problems of the play were very accurately discussed, as was the
identification of hands B and D in the original manuscript with Heywood
and Shakespeare respectively.1594 was given as a possible date. Maria
Concolato

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Virginia M. Byrne <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 17:50:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0486 New Novel about Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0486 New Novel about Shakespeare

Thanks I picked it up today . . . looks interesting.

Re: The Ghost in Ham

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0488.  Wednesday, 23 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Jeff Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 15:58:08 GMT
        Subj:   Re: Ghost

[2]     From:   Michael Skovmand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Apr 1997 10:16:07 MET
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0487  Re: The Ghost in Ham


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Apr 1997 15:58:08 GMT
Subject:        Re: Ghost

>If you look at the text closely you will see that Hamlet Snr is in
>Purgatory.  This is certainly a Roman Catholic, not a Reformation
>belief.  How long did the "old religion" hang on?  We simply do not
>know, but it clearly was around at the turn of the century in
>Shakespeare's and his audiences' minds.

Or the Devil is playing a papist trick by trying to make young Hamlet
think he is his father in purgatory.  A knowledge of the "old religion"
probably still hangs on in England today.  Is that what you meant by
"hang on"?

Jeff Myers

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Skovmand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Apr 1997 10:16:07 MET
Subject: 8.0487  Re: The Ghost in Ham
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0487  Re: The Ghost in Ham

The discussion on the ghost in * Ham*  in purgatory is related to
another  theme in Shakespeare: the fear of death  not simply  because
of  the loss of on'e s life, but "the dread of something after death, /
the undiscover'd country, from whose bourn no traveller returns..."
Claudio in *Measure*   expresses  exactly the same thought, although in
more personal terms than Hamlet: "Ay, but to die and go not where..."
(III.1.118).  Having taught both plays recently, it's struck me  how
this fear of the uncertainty of one's afterlife, in a literal sense, is
one of the few ideas in Shakespeare that is difficult to make sense of
to a late 20th C (Protestant) reader.  Hamlet's argument in the To Be or
Not To Be - soliloquy - that this fear is the reason people don't, or
hesitate to commit suicide  - however miserable their lives may be - has
never really seemed a convincing argument to me - as an argument within
Catholic dogma, yes, but existentially, hardly. We would like ; I think,
to read this part of the soliloquy as a kind of "Verschiebung" on the
part of Hamlet - Hamlet  coming up with theological arguments for what
is  really Hamlet playing the  old delay-game with himself.  And we
might be right, of course, in part - motivation is rarely unambiguous.
And in *Measure*  the motivation may be part of  a persuasive argument
directed at Isabella, to relent, and  give in to Angelo, to save
Claudio's life. Nevertheless - in both Claudio and Hamlet , the fear of
one's afterlife/purgatory  is not presented as part of  an antiquated
system of beliefs, but  as part of a shared and legitimate way of
thinking... or so it seems. Any comments?

Michael Skovmand
U. of Aarhus.
Denmark

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