1997

Distressed by *Lear*

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0472.  Thursday, 17 April 1997.

From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Apr 1997 08:18:31 +0000 (HELP)
Subject:        Distressed by *Lear*

An extraordinarily bright student in my Shakespeare class wrote me this
letter the day before yesterday; I have asked him to give me the essay
he describes. But he would appreciate close and specific answers to his
take on *King Lear*.

"Professor Hill:

 [....snip....]

So, to dispense with any further art, the matter is that I am in the
midst of reading *King Lear* (for the fourth time in a year) and have
yet to grasp-or even remotely discern-those themes which are often
attributed to it. I fail to see how, for instance, the Fool subsumes
Lear's character:  he is characterized largely by frivolity and flaccid
humor, his wisdom is overrated, and, if anything, *Lear* is the one who
subsumes *him*, for the King gradually takes over the role of purveyor
of preposterous prattle until the Fool falls silent in Act III Scene 6
and is never heard from again.  And what are these claims about Lear
having abandoned his masculinity, his nobility, his pride, and whatnot?
Stuff and nonsense, I say. Look at the text: it's dark, it's cold, and
it's raining. No wonder the King, once pampered and protected from the
elements, is somewhat miffed. But to say that he has all sorts of
apocalyptic revelations in the tempest, when all this doddering old fool
does is bemoan the loss of his cherished retinue and then beat his
breast for having lamented said loss of royal trappings in the first
place (talk about sour grapes), seems to me a spurious proposition.
What is this-I'm some sort of insensitive American rube? Am I missing
something here? Or do you mind if I stray somewhat from the prescribed
essay topics and devote my two thousand words simply to telling you what
I found interesting in King Lear?  These are not rhetorical questions. I
am beginning to wonder whether I am cut out for the literary-analytical
trade after all.

   Michael Laszlo

Re: Cordelia

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0471.  Thursday, 17 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Jacqueline Strax <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 09:43:54 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 8.0461  Re: The Fool; Cordelia

[2]     From:   Louis C Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 21:08:39 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0468 Re: Cordelia

[3]     From:   JoAnna Koskinen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Apr 1997 07:37:38 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0468  Re: Cordelia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jacqueline Strax <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 09:43:54 +0000
Subject: Re: The Fool; Cordelia
Comment:        SHK 8.0461  Re: The Fool; Cordelia

Susan:

I like your post this morning on Cordelia:

>I personally cannot say that I read those lines as Cordelia's
>stubbornness and as someone else pointed out to me recently,
>Goneril and Regan really say absolutely nothing to their father.
 >Goneril says, "Sir, I love you more than word can wield the
>matter,....  A love that makes breath poor and speech unable."
>(I. i. 50, 55) & then Regan says, "In my true heart I find she
>names my very deed of love"(I. i. 65-66) Well then why are they
>still talking? Sounds strange to me.  What I always find ironic
>is that critics who write about the stubborn, frigid, cold,
>unfeeling Cordelia I keep reading about in articles are so very
>much like Lear in their judgment of her.

I guess Regan and Goneril talk for display and in order to contend with
one another for dominance (or what some political analysts call
hegemony).  Although their rhetoric betrays this, Lear fails to catch
it.  Perhaps because he's too busy putting on his own rhetorical display
including maps.  It's as though Lear is trolling his daughters (and
those powerful husbands of theirs) into sharing the burdens of his
kingdom whilst propping up his conceit and his claims to perks and the
dignity of age.

Might see Lear's display as partly a tactic to make sure Cordelia gets
her man so there'll be three reliable males to rule over the daughters
once the deal is done and the land split.  However, Lear, increasingly
as his wracking advances, uses words not merely for display and hegemony
etc. but more like Cordelia does.  This is a bond between them.  Perhaps
that's why as the play opens Goneril and Regan already have husbands
(whom they don't love) while Cordelia's not yet found quite found the
right man to whom she can transfer and with whom she can trust her
affections-the love which till this point she has devoted to her
stubborn father.

Jacqueline Strax

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis C Swilley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 21:08:39 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.0468 Re: Cordelia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0468 Re: Cordelia

Cordelia's reaction to her father's request for a public expression of
her love is stubborn and wrongheaded. She knows her sisters and knows
that their expressions of love are lies; yet they have given her an
avenue for her response which will top theirs and still be true: the
first sister has said that she loves Lear more than anything; the
second, that she loves nothing else but him.  Cordelia could say - would
be expected to say - that she loves everything else because of him.  Not
only would this be true, it is the last step in the development of any
true love (the sisters have given the first two steps).

Someone in these responses has said that Cordelia should humour the old
man and simply lie.  She shouldn't and needn't.

What does she do instead?  She "cannot heave her heart into her mouth",
she says; but then she does.  And when she does, she measures out her
love, just as Lear is foolishly measuring love and dividing the country
according to that measure.  But the curious fact about love is that the
more it is expressed and felt in one direction the more it grows in all
directions - a young woman in love with her lover loves her father (and
everything lovable) the more for that.  But Cordelia?  She will take
"half her love" to her husband!

Cordelia is another Lear, but of a younger, other sex.

In his hotheadedness, Kent is yet another Lear.

The three of them dance the story along to its disaster and their
deaths.

L. Swilley
Houston

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JoAnna Koskinen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Apr 1997 07:37:38 -0700
Subject: 8.0468  Re: Cordelia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0468  Re: Cordelia

This is the sense I get from Cordelia's response as well. She goes on to
say in 1.1.97, "Why have my sisters husbands if they say/They love you
all?" Unfortunately, when I brought this up to my professor, I was told
that I was getting to psychological, but it seems to be quite clear and
appropriate for the age, if you ask me.

JoAnna

SNL Summer Festivals List from Winter Issue

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0469.  Wednesday, 16 April 1997.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, April 16, 1997
Subject:        SNL Summer Festivals List from Winter Issue

Below is the Summer Festivals list I submitted to *The Shakespeare
Newsletter*.  The editors decided to publish the list earlier than in
previous years and to include an update in the spring issue.

If you work with a festival that is not included, please contact me for
the format for an entry, and I'll include it in the next issue.

************************************************************************
Shakespeare Summer Festivals 1997 as submitted to the Winter issue of
*The Shakespeare Newsletter*
Compiled by Hardy M. Cook
Bowie State University


ALABAMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, 1 Festival Drive, Montgomery, AL
36117-4605. (800) 841-4273 or (334) 271-5353. 26th Season. Kent
Thompson, Artistic Director. March 4-Aug. 31.  In repertory Mac. (Kent
Thompson) March 11-July 26; LLL (Jacques Cartier)  April 8-July 27; MV
(Kent Thompson) June 3-July 26.  In stock: Cym. (Kent Thompson) Aug.
1-9.

AMERICAN PLAYERS THEATRE, P.O. Box 819, Spring Green, WI 53588. (608)
588-2361. 18th Season. June 12-Oct. 5.  David Frank, Artistic Director.
In repertory:  R3 (opens June 28); Err. (opens Aug. 16).

CARMEL SHAKE-SPEARE FESTIVAL, P.O. Box 222035, Carmel, CA 93922.  (408)
622-0100. 14th Season. Stephen Moorer, Artistic Director. Aug. 1-Oct.
12.  The Complete Works of Wllm Shkspr  (abridged). Aug. 1-October 11;
Rom. Sept. 6-Oct. 12; Cor. Sept. 26-Oct. 12.

COLORADO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, University of Colorado - Boulder, P.O.
Box 460, Boulder, CO 80309-0460. (303) 492-0554. 40th  Season.  Richard
M. Devin, Producing Artistic Director. June 27-Aug. 17. In repertory:
Rom. (Henry Godinez); Ado (Robin Mckee); Tro. (Tom Markus).

GEORGIA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, 4484 Peachtree Rd., N.E., Atlanta, GA
30319. (404) 264-0020.  12th Season.  Richard Garner, Producing
Director. June 20-Aug. 17  In repertory: Tmp., Oth.,  Inaugural season
in a new 510-seat theater at Oglethrope University.

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, P.O. Box 9365, Boise, ID 83707. (208)
336-9700. 21st  Season.  Charles Fee, Artistic Director.  June 12-Sept.
20.  MV (Bart Sher) June 26-Aug. 30; Shr. (Sari Ketter) July 10-Sept.
20; Mac. (Charles Fee) July 31-Aug. 31. Festival performs in an outdoor
amphitheater, picnicking encourages.

ILLINOIS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Campus Box 5700, Illinois State
University, Normal, IL 61790. (309) 438-2535. 20th  Season.  Calvin
MacLean, Artistic Director.  June 19-Aug. 9.  In repertory: AWW (Karen
Kessler); Ham. (Doug Finlayson); Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead
(Calvin MacLean).  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or
<www.orat.ilstu.edu/shakespeare>

KENTUCKY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, 1114 South Third St., Louisville, KY
40203. (502) 583-8738. Curt L. Tofteland, Producing Director.  June
12-July 6. Tmp. (Curt L. Tofteland); Pantalone Rides Again (Brandi J.
Smith).  First Annual Taste of Shakespeare June 6.
<members.iglou.com/kyshakes>

NASHVILLE SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL: Shakespeare in the Park, 2814 12th
Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37204.  (615) 292-2273.  10th Season.
Denice Hicks, Artistic Director. Aug. 1-31.  Shr.

NEW JERSEY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Drew University, 36 Madison Ave.,
Madison, NJ 07940 (201) 408-3278. 35th Season. Bonnie J. Monte, Artistic
Director. June 13-Aug. 24.  MND   (Bonnie J. Monte) June 13-29; Ado (Joe
Drischer) June 25-July 26; H5 (Scott Wentworth) July 15-Aug. 10. Annual
Shakespeare Colloquium July 19-20.

OLD GLOBE THEATRE. LOWELL DAVIES FESTIVAL THEATRE.  P.O. Box 2171, San
Diego, CA 92112. (619) 239-2255.  Jack O'Brien, Artistic Director.  June
29-Oct. 4.  Oth. (Jack O'Brien) June 29-Aug. 9; Err. (John Rando) Aug.
24-Oct. 4.

OKLAHOMA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL.  P.O. Box 1074, Durant, OK 74702.  (405)
924-0121 (extension 2385).  18th Season.  Molly Risso, Artistic
Director.  June 27-July 27.  Ant. (Molly Risso) July 18, 22, 26; The
Compleat Wks of Wllm Shkspr (Adbrided) (Patrick Benton) July 20, 21.
Hosted by Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

OREGON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, P.O. Box 158, Ashland, OR 97520. (541)
482-4331. 62nd  Year.  Libby Appel, Artistic Director. Feb. 21-Nov. 2.
Angus Bowmer Theatre: Lr. (Libby Appel) Feb. 21-Nov. 2. The Elizabethan
Theatre: AYL (Tazewell Thompson) June 10-Oct.12;  Tim. (Penny
Metropulos) June 11-Oct. 10; TGV (Ken Albers) June 12-Oct. 11. Plus
seven non-Shakespearean productions.  Backstage tours, lectures,
concerts, play readings, and more. Write or call for detailed brochure,
or visit Web at http://www.mind.net/osf/.

PENNSYLVANIA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL AT ALLENTOWN COLLEGE, 2755 Station
Ave., Center Valley, PA 18034. (610) 282-9455. Gerard J. Schubert,
O.S.F.S., Producing Artistic Director.  June 18-Aug. 9.  JC  (Gerard J.
Schubert, OSFS) June 18-July 12; Err. (Russell Treyz) July 23-Aug. 9.

THE PUBLICK THEATRE,  11 Ridgemont St., Boston, MA 02134. (617)
782-5425. Spiro Veloudos, Artistic Director.  June 5-Aug. 31. LLL July
10-27; AYL Aug. 19, 25, 26.

SHAKESPEARE & COMPANY - THE MOUNT, 2 Plunket St., P.O. Box 865, Lenox,
MA 01240. (413) 637-3353. 20th Season.  Tina Packer, Artistic Director.
May 23-Nov. 1.  Mainstage Theatre: 1H4  July 25-Aug. 31.  Other plays in
repertory include WT, MND, TN, and more.

SHAKSPEARE AT THE RUINS, The Four County Players, P.O. Box 1,
Barboursville, VA 22923. (540) 832-5355  25th Season.  Randall Herndon,
President. First three weekends in August. Rom. (Lydia Underwood
Horan).  Performed on grounds of the Barboursville Vineyards, using the
ruins of a Thomas Jefferson-designed home as part of the set.

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL OF DALLAS,  Sammons Center for the Arts, 3630 Harry
Hines Blvd., Dallas, TX 75219.  (214) 559-2778.  26th Season. Cliff
Redd, Executive Producer. June 17-July 27.  In repertory: Mac. (Raphael
Parry); TN (Sheriden Thomas). Performances in Samuell-Grand Park. Free.

SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK, 3113 South University, Fort Worth, TX 76109.
(817) 923-6698. 20th Season. Robert A. Fass, Executive Director. June
11-July 6. Shr. (Kenn Stilton) Trinity Park Playhouse.

SHAKESPEARE ON THE SASKATCHEWAN FESTIVAL, P.O. Box 1646, Saskatoon,
Saskatchewan, Canada S7K 3R8. 1-306-6523-2300. Henry Woolf, Artistic
Director.  13th Season. July 2-Aug. 17. In repetory: Tmp., JC, and
Shakespeare's Follies Revue! Revue!

SHAKESPEARE THEATRE FREE FOR ALL, 301 East Capitol Street, S.E.,
Washington, D.C. 20003. (202) 393-2700. 7th Season. Michael Kahn,
Artistic Director. June 8-22. H5 (Michael Kahn). Featuring Harry Hamlin.
At the Carter Barron Amphitheatre in Rock Creek Park

STERLING RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL, 15431 Farden Road, Sterling, NY 13156.
1-800-879-4446. 21th  Season. June 28-Aug. 10. Gary Izzo, Artistic
Director. Shr., MWW, MND, Comedia dell'arte show.

STRATFORD FESTIVAL THEATRE, Box 520, Stratford, Ontario, Canada N5A 6V2.
(519) 273-1600 or 1-800-567-1600. 45th Season. May 13-Nov. 9.  Richard
Monette, Artistic Director.  Rom. (Diane Leblanc) May 13-Nov. 8; R3
(John Wood) June 12-Sept. 20.

TEXAS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Kilgore College, 1100 Broadway, Kilgore, TX
75662.  (903) 983-8117.  Raymond Caldwell, Artistic Director.  May
18-July 29.  In rotating repertory. TN (Kathy Barber); H5 (Eve Adamson);
and more.  http://www.under.org/tsf.

THE THEATER AT MONMOUTH: The Shakespeare Theater Of Maine,  P.O. Box
385, Monmouth, ME 04259-0385. (207) 933-9999. 28th Season. Michael
O'Brien, Artistic Director. July 2-Aug. 30. MND (Michael O'Brien) opens
July 10; Ham.  (Chris Weinstein) opens July 20. Plays are performed in
rotating repertory at Cumston Hall - a national historic landmark
building erected in 1900.

THEATREWORKS SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado
Springs, CO 80933.  (719) 593-3240. Murray Ross, Artistic Director. 15th
Season.  July 18-Aug. 10.  MND.  Live music, art, food.

UTAH SHAKESPEAREAN FESTIVAL, 351 W. Center St., Cedar City, UT 84720.
(801) 586-7878.  36th Season. Fred C. Adams, Founder and Executive
Director; Douglas N. Cook and Cameron Harvey, Producing Artistic
Directors; R. Scott Phillips, Managing Director.  June 23-Aug. 30.  In
repertory: Per. (Michael Addison); H5 (Paul Barnes); Ham. (Howard
Jensen); TN (Bruce K. Sevy).

VIRGINIA SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, College of William & Mary, P.O. Box 8795,
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795. (757) 221-2660. 19th Season.  Jerry H.
Bledsoe, Executive Director.  July 11-Aug. 3. In repertory: Shr. opens
July 11; Cor. opens July 18.

WASHINGTON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, P.O. Box 1501, Olympia, WA 98507.
(360) 943-9492.  12th Season.  Aug. 7-Aug. 30.  In repertory Tmp., Err.,
Oth., and The Compleat Works of Wllm Shkspr (Adbrided).

WISCONSIN SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, Center for the Arts, U of W,
Platteville, WI 53818-3099. (608) 342-1298. 21th Season. Thomas P.
Collins, Artistic Director. July 9-Aug. 9. In repertory: TNGV opens July
9; WT opens July 10; Tro. opens July 11. "Talk-backs" (Tuesday evenings)
and Backstage tours (Saturday mornings).

Re: Ideology

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0470.  Thursday, 17 April 1997.

[1]     From:   Phyllis Rackin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 09:15:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0458  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT

[2]     From:   Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Apr 97 10:38:00 CDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0467  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT

[3]     From:   Robin D. H. Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Apr 1997 15:51:20 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0458 Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Phyllis Rackin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Apr 1997 09:15:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0458  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0458  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT

This will probably sound like a rhetorical question, but it isn't.  Is
there anyone out there who has changed his/her mind as a result of the
"ideology" thread?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Apr 97 10:38:00 CDT
Subject: 8.0467  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0467  Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT

To return to Paul Hawkins question of a while back: what do ideological
readings (which to him appear to always be reductive) add to aesthetic
ones?

In order to have an aesthetic response, a reader/audience member/student
must be able to place a play within some sort of context.  To many of my
students, early modern England is utterly foreign-so much so that the
differences initially preclude their having an aesthetic response at
all.  By studying culture (which is nothing if not saturated with
ideology), I can supply my students with a context in which to place the
works, and an approach to analyze the different ways one might see
things even from within that single culture.  This also enables me to
help them place the plays within their own culture-giving them a second
way to contextualize the works, and the tools with which to explore
alternative interpretations from within that culture.  In this way,
cultural study (which is in many ways ideological study)  adds layers to
their understanding of the plays.  They come to see them as complex
texts that offer a variety of interpretations.

This, of course, runs up against the poster who complains that a
post-modern reaction to a play is somehow not as valid as a historically
based one, asking "whose plays are these, anyway, yours or
Shakespeare's. (Pardon me but I can't remember who said this).  This is
a point well taken, and I think that it is an important part of the
process to come to an understanding of the original contexts of the
plays, but I also think that to insist only on historical readings dooms
these texts to be relics of the literature department.  A play-going
audience cannot take a history course every time they go to the
theater.  As the director and actors make decisions about the production
of the play, they make links with the culture of the audience (even if
that link is as small as using a proscenium stage, or as large as
dressing Titania in a clown suit).  These decisions draw on the multiply
layered understanding of the play arrived at by the director based on
her understanding both of her own world and the world of Shakespeare.
The layering of ideologies only adds to the complexity of our
understanding of the plays.  Just as an analysis of those ideologies
adds further layers to the ways in which we understand our reactions to
the plays.  Even if we "do" cultural studies, our departments are still
filed under "humanities."

Lysbeth Em Benkert

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robin D. H. Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Apr 1997 15:51:20 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 8.0458 Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0458 Re: Ideology: The Aesthetics of WT

Dear Terry,

I enjoyed our chat on the bus in Washington (and share your views on the
dreadful Tories and the only slightly less egregious Blair). But I'm
genuinely puzzled that it should make you squirm when people say they
love Shakespeare. Richard Barnfield talks about the fact that his friend
"Maister RL" loves Dowland, while he himself prefers Spenser ("thou
lov'st the one, and I the other"). He goes on: "Dowland to thee is
deare; whose heavenly tuch / Upon the Lute, doeth ravish humaine sense:
/ Spenser to mee; whose deepe Conceit is such, / As passing all Conceit,
needs no defence".

I can't pretend actually to love Spenser, though I'm quite happy to
admit, with no affectation at all, that I share Barnfield's love of
Dowland, and was also ravished when I was lucky enough to attend a
private recital of his songs recently in a 15th-century monastery in
Seville (compliment to you Rafael if you're listening). I know that Kay
Stanton has similar feelings about listening to Shakespeare. Why does
that make you squirm?  You're not tone deaf are you?

PS: the invitation to write for Renaissance Forum is still open.

Best wishes,
Robin

Re: Cordelia

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0468.  Wednesday, 16 April 1997.

From:           Susan Mather <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 15 Apr 1997 23:24:25 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0461  Re: The Fool; Cordelia
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0461  Re: The Fool; Cordelia

I think it was in Mark Taylor's book that I read this-Cordelia speaks
appropriately since she's about to be married.  He says that "if she
[tells] Lear what he wants to hear, she would then implicitly have to
contradict herself or else appear indifferent to her suitors" (54).
Diane Dreher in her book <Domination and Defiance...> argues similarly
that as she is "soon to be married, Cordelia will not prostitute the
ritual" as her sisters have done (67).

I personally cannot say that I read those lines as Cordelia's
stubbornness and as someone else pointed out to me recently, Goneril and
Regan really say absolutely nothing to their father.  Goneril says,
"Sir, I love you more than word can wield the matter,....  A love that
makes breath poor and speech unable." (I. i. 50, 55) & then Regan says,
"In my true heart I find she names my very deed of love"(I. i. 65-66)
Well then why are they still talking?
Sounds strange to me.  What I always find ironic is that critics who
write about the stubborn, frigid, cold, unfeeling Cordelia I keep
reading about in articles are so very much like Lear in their judgment
of her.  Take Care, Susan

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