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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Possible Project Entering Renaissance Texts and
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0560.  Wednesday, 14 May 1997.

From:           Greg Crane <
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Date:           Tuesday, 13 May 1997 10:00:39 -0400
Subject:        Possible Project Entering Renaissance Texts and Shakespeare
Sources

A New Library of Renaissance Source Materials

Preliminary Notice: May 9, 1997

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PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPOST WHERE APPROPRIATE

For an HTML version of this announcement and the preliminary list of
source materials, see:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/sources.html

The Perseus Project has spent the last ten years developing a digital
library of ancient materials. In the past year, we have begun to work on
Latin and English texts as well. We are currently in the process of
putting all of the work of Marlowe onto the WWW.

Given our familiarity with Latin and nonstandardized English spelling,
we are looking to work more generally on English Renaissance source
materials. We are planning to create a large WWW database of sources
that will include Holinshed, North's Plutarch and other texts, such as
those that appear in Geoffrey Bullough's eight volume collection of
Shakespeare's sources. This database will include classical and
Renaissance contemporary sources, as well as Renaissance resources, such
as critical books or essays (i.e. George Puttenham's The Arte of English
Poesie). A number of key sources for this period have been entered. Our
goal will be to extend what has been done and to begin systematic entry
of a wide range of texts.

Please help us to develop the following wish-list of texts.  We have
broken down the list into subsets, but feel free to offer suggestions
that do not appear to fit under any one of our headings. We would not,
for instance, be limited to Shakespeare's sources alone. What textual
resources would you like to see made available on-line that we have not
included here? If the source is particularly obscure, let us know in a
word why it is significant. Please write us with your suggestions
[
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 ]. The list itself is available at:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/sources.html
 

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