1997

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0564.  Thursday, 15 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, May 14, 1997
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[2]     From:   Jeff Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 14:27:31 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[3]     From:   Gwenette Gaddis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 09:29:46 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[4]     From:   Mason West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 11:05:29
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[5]     From:   Nick Kind <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 17:04:56 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[6]     From:   Herman Asarnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 09:06:07 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557 Q: Heartsease

[7]     From:   Jeff Barker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 17:11:48 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

[8]     From:   Marga Munkelt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 May 1997 09:56:07 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Marder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, May 14, 1997
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

Heather:  Heart's ease is mentioned in HV 4.1.236.  But as a flower it
is a synonym for the  pansy, the love-in-idleness used as a philtre in
MND II.1.  See also I.1 where Egeus says his daughter has been
bewitched.  Heather, you are yourself a flower.  I have walked on the
hills in Scotland covered with heather.  How wondrous soft it is.  Louis
Marder, Shakespeare Data Bank This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 14:27:31 GMT
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

Isn't it in _Romeo and Juliet_?  A servant asks the musicians present
for the planned wedding to play "Heart's Ease" after she has been
discovered dead.  There is still an English Country Dance (from
Playford, I believe) by that name.

Jeff Myers

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gwenette Gaddis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 09:29:46 -0500
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

I have a book called "Shakespeare's Birds," which lists on its dust
jacket another book in this series-"Shakespeare's Flowers" by Jessica
Kerr (illustrated in full color by Anne Ophelia Dowden).  The bird book
(copyright 1983) has illustrations, quotations, and commentary.  I'm
assuming the flower book would be the same.  I'm sorry I don't have a
copy of the flower book so I can help you more-I've looked for it, but
haven't found it yet.

gg
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mason West <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 11:05:29
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

I'm not sure if this is what you want, but the search engine on the Web
page, "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare" at

    http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/works.html

doesn't find the exact phrase "heartsease" in the works (complete), but
when searching for both words "heart" and "ease" in the same passage, I
had the following results:

KING RICHARD III, Act 4, Scene 4: "Help not all, yet do they ease the
heart."
1 KING HENRY IV, Act 1, Scene 3: "And tell him so; for I will ease my
heart,"
3 KING HENRY VI, [no act and scene given], "It could not slake mine ire,
nor ease my heart."
KING HENRY V, Act 4, Scene 1: "But his own wringing! What infinite
heart's-ease"
ROMEO AND JULIET, Act 4, Scene 5: "Musicians, O, musicians, 'heart's
ease,
heart's ease:' O, an you will have me live, play 'heart's ease.' ... Why
'heart's ease?'"
TITUS ANDRONICUS, Act 5, Scene 2: "And on them shalt thou ease thy angry
heart."
JULIUS CAESAR, Act 1, Scene 2: "Such men as he be never at heart's ease"

-- Mason West
   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
   http://www.pobox.com/~mason

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Kind <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 17:04:56 +0100
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

From the Arden Shakespeare CD-ROM:

Cupid's flower  n. The pansy, (also called) heartease  MND 4.1.72 Dian's
bud o'er Cupid's flower.

Nick Kind
Electronic Development Editor
The Arden Shakespeare

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Herman Asarnow <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 09:06:07 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0557 Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557 Q: Heartsease

You'll find "heartsease" in _King Henry V_, Act IV, Scene i:

230             We must bear all. O hard condition,
231             Twin-born with greatness: subject to the breath
232             Of every fool, whose sense no more can feel
233             But his own wringing. What infinite heartsease
234             Must kings neglect that private men enjoy?
235             And what have kings that privates have not too,
236             Save ceremony, save general ceremony?
237             And what art thou, thou idol ceremony?
238             What kind of god art thou, that suffer
239             Of mortal griefs than do thy worshippers?

[7]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeff Barker <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 17:11:48 CST
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

Reply to Heather Stephenson regarding "heartsease"

THE HARVARD CONCORDANCE TO SHAKESPEARE lists only one mention that comes
close:  HENRY V, Act iv, scene i, line 236

"What infinite heart's ease must kings neglect, that private men
enjoy!"  (Riverside)

Jeff Barker
Department of Theatre/Speech
Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa

[8]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marga Munkelt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 May 1997 09:56:07 EDT
Subject: 8.0557  Q: Heartsease
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0557  Q: Heartsease

Heartsease is another name for pansy-as is love-in-idleness. Ophelia
uses pansies in HAM Act 4, Scene 5; Oberon's magic flower in MND is
called love-in-idleness (Act 2, Scene 1).

M.M.

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