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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Assorted Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0577.  Monday, 19 May 1997.

[1]     From:   John Cox <
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        Date:   Friday, 16 May 1997 12:15:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Sinking on Stage

[2]     From:   Gabriel Wasserman <
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        Date:   Sunday, 18 May 1997 18:02:08 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0572  Re: Music/Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <
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Date:           Friday, 16 May 1997 12:15:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Sinking on Stage

Here is a question for theater historians.  In Thomas Heywood's *The
Silver Age* (about 1611), the verb "sink" is used several times as a
stage direction, or an implicit stage direction.  Sometimes it's a
reflexive verb ("I sink myself") when a character is preparing to enter
"hell."  Clearly the reference is to descending beneath the stage, but
why "sink"?  That is, what mechanism might have made it possible for an
actor to "sink" rather than jump into a trap or climb down a ladder?  I
can picture this happening easily with a hydraulic mechanism, but I
can't imagine how it might happened on the amphitheater stage. Any
suggestions? Any parallels from other plays?

John Cox

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Wasserman <
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Date:           Sunday, 18 May 1997 18:02:08 -0400
Subject: 8.0572  Re: Music/Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0572  Re: Music/Shakespeare

Is there anything on MIDI?  That would be very good, either on the
internet or on the Norton CD-ROM.  Speaking of the Norton CD-ROM, I was
today looking at the *Norton Shakespeare* and noticed that they used the
Oxford Shakespeare (Taylor et Wells ed., 1986) as their base text, which
they annotated.  Why the Oxford Shakespeare?  Does anyone here know?

Speaking of making things available on the internet, is there any
stylometry program on
the internet for general consumption?  When is SHAXICON '97 coming out
on the internet?
 

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