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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Re: Staging Sinking: Deadly Sins
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0586.  Wednesday, 21 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Andrew Gurr <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 May 1997 10:23:41 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0581  Re: Staging Sinking

[2]     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Tuesday, 20 May 1997 15:01 ET
        Subj:   SHK 8.0566  Re: King Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Gurr <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 May 1997 10:23:41 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 8.0581  Re: Staging Sinking
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0581  Re: Staging Sinking

Macbeth, when seeing the witches for the second time, asks "Why sinks
that cauldron?" He's presumably registering an action with the trapdoor
that some spectators might not have been able to see because of the
crowd of witches. The Globe in 1606 must have had a device to lower
things down the trap fairly slowly. It implies, among other things, that
if there was a stage machine for winching objects up or down, the trap
door or doors must have opened upwards, to give the machinery space to
be worked. An understage platform with variable levels would allow the
trap to be used for Juliet's tomb, but would inhibit the Hamlet ghost
making a rapid entry or exit. Roll on the guesswork.

Andrew Gurr.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Tuesday, 20 May 1997 15:01 ET
Subject: Re: King Lear
Comment:        SHK 8.0566  Re: King Lear

As to R. Schmeekler on tragedy, the deadly sins, and gluttony, how about
the composite Tragedy of Sir John Falstaff (the Gula Archipelago),
comprising the relevant scenes from 1H4, 2H4, and H5; I think Orson
Welles noticed this, too.

Hungrily,
Dave Evett
 

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