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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Re: Staging Sinking
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0587.  Thursday, 22 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 May 1997 11:29:24 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking

[2]     From:   Jerry Bangham <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 21 May 1997 18:37:49 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 May 1997 11:29:24 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking

I believe that great Italian invention, the Star Trap, was used
somewhere in Renaissance London. It was so called because of its
iris-like construction that closed in upon itself, was made of thick
enough leather to support human weight, and actors could be very quickly
propelled upwards through and above it, so that ground closed beneath
their feet. Their propulsion was effected by a spring on which they
stood.  If this be myth, and upon some authority so proved, I'll stop
telling my classes about it, as I've long since forgotten its source.

        Harry Hill

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
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Date:           Wednesday, 21 May 1997 18:37:49 -0400
Subject: 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0586  Re: Staging Sinking

>It implies, among other things, that
>if there was a stage machine for winching objects up or down, the trap
>door or doors must have opened upwards, to give the machinery space to
>be worked.

I'd think that it would be possible to have two doors that could drop. A
trap mechanism could then be moved in. As I write this, it occurs to me
that this would work lot better to lower something than to raise it
since the top of the trap would fill the opening if the trap were up,
but you'd have a hole when it was down.

By the 19th century, this problem had been well solved. I suppose that
the Elizabethans may have figured this out also.
 

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