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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Qs: Shakespearean Verse and Documents
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0593.  Friday, 23 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Jody Tate <
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        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 08:31:28 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Qs: Speaking Verse in Shakespeare's Day and Teaching Blank Verse

[2]     From:   Russ  McDonald <
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        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 17:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespearean Documents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jody Tate <
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Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 08:31:28 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Qs: Speaking Verse in Shakespeare's Day and Teaching Blank
Verse

Hello all:

I was wondering if there is an agreement currently on how Shakespeare's
verse, his iambic pentameter, would have been performed on the
Elizabethan/Jacobean stage. Actors in the period were often praised for
their "naturalness", Burbage being one, but it's not difficult to
imagine that their conception of "naturalness" was quite different from
ours. For example, a famous actor praised in the 17th cent. for his
naturalness also had a wig made to stand on end during the "scary" parts
of Macbeth.

So, more succinctly, was there a "high" or "grand" style of declamation
during Shakespeare's day or was it more "natural" in terms of our
standards today?

Also, I was wondering if any teachers of Shakespeare out there had any
lesson plans they would share concerning teaching Shakespeare's blank
verse or his "metrical art" in general to undergraduates. Is classical
foot-prosody still used? Has anyone tried Attridge's method of
scansion?  Is there a focus on the physical rhythm of the language or is
more attention directed toward the rhetorical implications? Are the
students asked to physically get out of their chairs and perform bits of
verse?

These questions are asked as part of a graduate seminar I'm taking on
teaching Shakespeare to undergraduates, and asked partly in response to
what seems to be a renewed interest in the formal elements of verse.

Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your responses.

Jody

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russ  McDonald <
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Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 17:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespearean Documents

I received the following message which I thought list members might be
able to help with.  Could you forward any such information either to me
or the writer, or post them generally as appropriate?  Thanks,  Russ
McDonald

From:           Larry Barkley <
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Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 04:09:45 -0800
Subject:        Shakespearean Documents

Good Afternoon, Dr. McDonald:  Recently while reading your "The Bedford
Companion to Shakespeare" I began to consider the possibility of finding
historical documents concerned with Shakespeare posted on the World Wide
Web.  I have conducted several searches, using a variety of terms, but
to date I have had no relavent hits.  Are you aware of any site or sites
that post such documents?  If you are and are able to share the
locations, I would appreciate the information.  If you are unaware of
any such sites, I will continue searching, and should I find any, I will
let you know.

Cordially,
Larry Barkley
 

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