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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Qs: Droeshout; Themes in King Lear; Giordano Bruno
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0605.  Wednesday, 28 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Tom Marshall <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27-May-1997 10:36:16 -0400 -0500
        Subj:   Droeshout

[2]     From:   Chris Clark <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27 May 1997 19:54:17 GMT
        Subj:   Themes in King Lear

[3]     From:   Valentin Gerlier <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 27 May 1997 14:16:18
        Subj:   [Giordano Bruno]


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Marshall <
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Date:           Tuesday, 27-May-1997 10:36:16 -0400 -0500
Subject:        Droeshout

An elementary question:  How is "Droeshout" pronounced?  I've seen it
written a million times but have never heard it spoken.

Thanks,
Tom Marshall

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Clark <
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Date:           Tuesday, 27 May 1997 19:54:17 GMT
Subject:        Themes in King Lear

I am preparing for my examination on King Lear, and have one week left
to revise. The way I have found is most successful for doing this is to
try to split the work into themes, because essay questions will always
REALLY be addressing the theme, rather than a statement. Can people
please help me discern which are the themes in Lear?

I can come up with:

        judgement
        justice
        rebellion
        distance/power

Also, how safe is it to distinguish between Cordelia and the Fool
because the link between them does seem to be very strong?

Thank you for your kind assistance.

Chris

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Valentin Gerlier <
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Date:           Tuesday, 27 May 1997 14:16:18
Subject:        [Giordano Bruno]

Dear SHAKSPEAReans,

I was wondering if anyone had anything to say about the presence of
philosopher Giordano Bruno's influence in some of Shakespeare's work. I
am saying this because both the poet's and Bruno's apparent deification
of Divine Love (I may be safe in referring to some of the speeches in
Love's Labour's Lost and Measure for Measure) interests me. I am not
bringing forward a theory that he was influenced, but I would like to
discuss it with anyone who is interested in it. Also, a movement called
"Occult Neoplatonism", (which, I think, the philosopher John Dee was
interested in, and which also reflect some of Giordano Bruno's ideas)
seem to have been very prominent in intellectual circles during S's
time. Is Prospero in "The Tempest" a character which reflects that
influence? I am referring especially to the speech at the beginning of
IV.i.  Please feel free to write to me personally.

Regards,
Valentin Gerlier
 

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