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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Re: Identifying Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0607.  Thursday, 29 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Norm Holland <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 28 May 97 17:16:13 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

[2]     From:   Valentin Gerlier <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 1997 08:27:17
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

[3]     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 1997 05:43:05 -0400
        Subj:   SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norm Holland <
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Date:           Wednesday, 28 May 97 17:16:13 EDT
Subject: 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

Re: plagiarism

Some years back-and it may still be on the market-a software firm was
demonstrating at MLA a program to detect plagiarism.  It worked by
deleting every fifth word (or third or tenth-you could vary the
parameter) in the suspect paper.  (Of course, you had to get the paper
into your computer-but that, too, might be an opportunity for
questioning the student. Ask him or her for the file, and see what it
looks like.) Once the paper is "clozed" this way, you ask the student to
supply the missing words.

I realize this is very policey, and I don't like it.  But I always
preface any paper assignments in my classes with a handout that
demonstrates the methods of documentation and states that plagiarism is
a form of cheating.  If a student plagiarizes after that, I think
there's little reason to be charitable.

--Best, Norm Holland

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Valentin Gerlier <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 May 1997 08:27:17
Subject: 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

In response to Charles Henebry (and to others)

Identifying plagiarism is not the problem; the problem is that is there
altogether. I agree with John V. Robinson; surely there must be a
problem either in the way the teacher has taught or in the way the
student is learning. Although I'm not in a position to say anything
about teachers, I am a student. The reason I never plagiarize is because
I am fortunate enough to love the study of Shakespeare because I find
something meaningful in it and I want to communicate it. In times when I
was unclear about a particular assignment, I went straight to the
teacher and said: "look, I don't understand this and you didn't explain
that properly" or something of the kind. Students find Shakespeare
boring: I have a good teacher, but I know that some altogether hate it,
and it is often because the teachers, to put it quite strongly (and
forgive me if I offend) don't care about the students nor about what
they teach. I would like to ask of all teachers, in the name of
Shakespeare students, that they help students to be creative, to work
intelligently, to be interested and to have a good relationship with
them rather than just try to crush them.  Education systems are failing
all over the world just because students and teachers are uninterested.

I hope these comments are of some help to anybody!

Regards,
Valentin Gerlier
<
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[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 May 1997 05:43:05 -0400
Subject: Re: Identifying Plagiarism
Comment:        SHK 8.0604  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

For Harry Hill: The footnote linking 'Oed und leer Das Meer' in The
Waste Land to Tristan und Isolde was of course supplied by T.S. Eliot
himself, not the editors of the Norton anthology. Mind you, this
confirms your judgement about it being an act of the 'half-educated'.
Poor Tom. All those survey courses.
 

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