1997

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0611.  Friday, 30 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 97 16:53:21 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0609  Q: Metaphor

[2]     From:   Alan Pierpoint <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 1997 23:18:53 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0609 Q: Metaphor


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norm Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 May 97 16:53:21 EDT
Subject: 8.0609  Q: Metaphor
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0609  Q: Metaphor

I'm glad someone mentioned Jakobson's essay on aphasia.  It gives me the
chance to sound an alert.  Jakobson's view of aphasias as mirrored in
metonymy and metaphor (rather oddly defined) is quite out of date.  More
modern accounts of the aphasias point us toward a far more complex
linguistics than Saussure's (also quite out of date).  See Steven
Pinker's _The Language Instinct_ for a quite readable account of both
the aphasias and post-Saussurean, post-Bloomfieldian, post-Whorfian
linguistics. Those earlier versions pass current among literary critics,
but not linguists.

--Best, Norm Holland

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alan Pierpoint <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 May 1997 23:18:53 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0609 Q: Metaphor
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0609 Q: Metaphor

Regarding metaphor, simile and Shakespeare:  You might find something in
"The Four Master Tropes," Kenneth Burke's nearly inscrutable essay
appended to the back of A Grammar of Motive.   He discusses, if memory
serves, metaphor, simile, (or was it irony?),metonymy, and synecdoche in
terms of four different rhetorical strategies.  I don't remember if
Burke brought the fog of his intellect to bear on Shakespeare, but I do
recall using the metonymy-reduction idea in a paper on Adrienne Rich
back in grad school, and getting away with it.  Good luck.

Alan Pierpoint   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.