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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: May ::
Re: Identifying Plagiarism
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0612.  Friday, 30 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 1997 16:34:16 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0607  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

[2]     From:   David Dyal <
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        Date:   Thursday, 29 May 1997 20:19:27 -0700
        Subj:   Plagiarism


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 29 May 1997 16:34:16 -0400
Subject: 8.0607  Re: Identifying Plagiarism
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0607  Re: Identifying Plagiarism

Norm Holland wrote:

This is only tangentially related, but ... It's serendipitous that this
subject came up just now. I recently began reading a series of mystery
novels by Edith Skom, whose amateur detective is a literature professor
at a university near Chicago. Her detective has a strong reaction to any
hint of plagiarism by students; she is mercilessly teased by her
colleagues for the amount of time she's willing to put in tracking down
sources. I recommend this series (two novels so far, a third in the
works) if you need a break from the Bard. If you've ever wished one of
your colleagues an early trip to regions of thick-ribbed ice, you'll
especially enjoy the first one ("The Mark Twain Murders").

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Dyal <
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Date:           Thursday, 29 May 1997 20:19:27 -0700
Subject:        Plagiarism

>From the netherworld of god terms:

Let's see if I've got this right:  A student lies, cheats, and
steals-all essential elements of plagiarism-and something's wrong with
the teacher or subject.  Just another of the many wonderful fruits our
brave new world, I guess.  I figured out that concepts like honor and
integrity were cultural constructions when I was in high school, long
before the current critical jargon co-opted the obvious and acted as if
they had discovered something new, which in itself is a form of
plagiarism.  But that doesn't change the fact that concepts like honor
and integrity are essential.  We have to act as if honor is an absolute,
even it's not.  My student evaluations consistently tell me that I am an
engaged, fair teacher.  But woe be it to the student who gets caught
plagiarizing in my class.

David Dyal
 

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