1997

Re; Shakespeare Internet Resources (Documents)

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0595.  Sunday, 25 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 May 1997 08:01:44 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Documents

[2]     From:   Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 May 97 10:21:53 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Verse and Documents

[3]     From:   Leanore Lieblein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 May 1997 15:03:17 EST5EDT
        Subj:   McGill Shakespeare Resources Page


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 May 1997 08:01:44 -0800
Subject: 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Documents
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Documents

Salutations Shakespeareans!

This email is for Russ McDonald, concerning where to get Shakespearean
Docs on the net.  One-stop-shopping for most things bardolatrous on the
net is Terry Gray's "Mr. William Shakespeare and the Internet," the URL
for which is:

        http://www.palomar.edu/Library/shake.htm

There's also the Oxford Text Archive, but I don't think this is the sort
of thing Mr. Barkley is questing after.

        A fine Memorial Day Weekend to all!
                Brad Berens

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 May 97 10:21:53 EDT
Subject: 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Verse and Documents
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0593  Qs: Shakespearean Verse and Documents

My favorite Shakespearean URL is Terry Gray's "Mr. William Shakespeare
on the Internet." It takes a while to load, but provides excellent and
intelligent coverage. Mr. Barkley will find that it leads him to a
number of historical and contextual sites. Ms. Tate will find Amy Ulen's
site listed under the EDUCATION header; my students who were training to
be high school teachers thought it offered excellent exercises on meter
and stress for any classroom.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Leanore Lieblein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 May 1997 15:03:17 EST5EDT
Subject:        McGill Shakespeare Resources Page

SHAKSPEReans may be interested in visiting the McGill Shakespeare
Resources Page at

http://www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/english/puck/links.html

Comments welcome.

--Leanore Lieblein

Re: Music/Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0594.  Sunday, 25 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Rod Osiowy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 23 May 1997 08:52:04 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0591  Re: Music/Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 24 May 1997 14:39:52 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Music for Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rod Osiowy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 23 May 1997 08:52:04 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 8.0591  Re: Music/Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0591  Re: Music/Shakespeare

I just read a review of "The Tempest" in a local paper where the critic
stated, "the work of Shakespeare is lyrical in itself and any insertion
of contemporary music with original or other dialogue is inappropriate.
It only serves to distract and songs are not a part of Shakespeare."

I saw "The Tempest" and believe that the dances in it require music, or
the audience would experience the distraction of dance without music.
Ariel's songs are written into the script, I believe, and are open to
musical interpretation within character.  The evening of this particular
performance experienced some technical glitches with wireless
microphones, but otherwise, the music was very befitting the time,
setting and performance.  I wonder where people get these ideas about
Shakespeare's plays?  Surely Shakespeare knew the power of music in live
performance...

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 24 May 1997 14:39:52 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Music for Shakespeare

Since there are several members of this list who have vivid memories of
the music of their theatre-going youth, I thought I might ask just how
far back their memory might go.

There are credits, throughout Sir John Gielgud's season at the Queen's
Theatre, 1937-1938, for composer Herbert Menges.  So far as I know,
there are no recordings of his work, and I am curious if anyone can
describe the music he composed, whether for this or any other
productions on the West End at that time.  In particular, there were
productions of Richard II and Merchant of Venice, which generated some
controversy among the critics.  It would be of great interest to me, to
find out whether his music played a part in the response to Gielgud and
Motley's new approach to stagecraft, or whether his musical choices were
conventional and played to the more traditional expectations of a
commercial audience at the time.

Remarks can be sent directly to me, or can be shared with the rest of
our group, as you wish.

Many thanks in advance,

Andy White
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Renaissance Forum v2no1

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0592.  Friday, 23 May 1997.

From:           R. D. H. Wells <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 16:24:59 +0100 (BST)
Subject:        Renaissance Forum v2no1

RENAISSANCE FORUM

The editors are pleased to announce the Spring 1997 issue of
*Renaissance Forum*. The journal is available from

http://www.hull.ac.uk/Hull/EL_Web/renforum/index.html

or

http://www.hull.ac.uk/english/renforum/index.html

In volume two, number one, Richard Danson Brown examines Spenser's *The
Ruines of Time*, David Lucking engenders meaning in *Much Ado About
Nothing* and Kevin Sharpe explores the political world of Thomas
Wentworth.

Plus reviews by Mike Braddick, Martin Butler, Richard Dutton, Lisa
Hopkins, Norman Jones, Julie Sanders, David Siar and Ceri Sullivan of
books by  Lisa Jardine, Ivo Kamps, David Lindley, Thomas H. Luxon, John
Morrill, William W. E. Slights and Penry Williams as well as titles in
the Keele University Press Ryburn Renaissance Texts and Studies series.

The editors welcome articles on the history and literature of the
English Early Modern period, and reasoned responses to articles already
published in *Renaissance Forum*.

Potential reviewers should send a short cv to the technical editor at

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

If you wish to be removed from the Renforum electronic information list
send a message consisting of the word   unsubscribe   to

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Robin Headlam Wells
Glenn Burgess
Editors, *Renaissance Forum*

Qs: Shakespearean Verse and Documents

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0593.  Friday, 23 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Jody Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 08:31:28 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Qs: Speaking Verse in Shakespeare's Day and Teaching Blank Verse

[2]     From:   Russ  McDonald <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 17:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespearean Documents


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jody Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 08:31:28 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Qs: Speaking Verse in Shakespeare's Day and Teaching Blank
Verse

Hello all:

I was wondering if there is an agreement currently on how Shakespeare's
verse, his iambic pentameter, would have been performed on the
Elizabethan/Jacobean stage. Actors in the period were often praised for
their "naturalness", Burbage being one, but it's not difficult to
imagine that their conception of "naturalness" was quite different from
ours. For example, a famous actor praised in the 17th cent. for his
naturalness also had a wig made to stand on end during the "scary" parts
of Macbeth.

So, more succinctly, was there a "high" or "grand" style of declamation
during Shakespeare's day or was it more "natural" in terms of our
standards today?

Also, I was wondering if any teachers of Shakespeare out there had any
lesson plans they would share concerning teaching Shakespeare's blank
verse or his "metrical art" in general to undergraduates. Is classical
foot-prosody still used? Has anyone tried Attridge's method of
scansion?  Is there a focus on the physical rhythm of the language or is
more attention directed toward the rhetorical implications? Are the
students asked to physically get out of their chairs and perform bits of
verse?

These questions are asked as part of a graduate seminar I'm taking on
teaching Shakespeare to undergraduates, and asked partly in response to
what seems to be a renewed interest in the formal elements of verse.

Thanks for your time, and I look forward to your responses.

Jody

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Russ  McDonald <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 17:30:56 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespearean Documents

I received the following message which I thought list members might be
able to help with.  Could you forward any such information either to me
or the writer, or post them generally as appropriate?  Thanks,  Russ
McDonald

From:           Larry Barkley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 04:09:45 -0800
Subject:        Shakespearean Documents

Good Afternoon, Dr. McDonald:  Recently while reading your "The Bedford
Companion to Shakespeare" I began to consider the possibility of finding
historical documents concerned with Shakespeare posted on the World Wide
Web.  I have conducted several searches, using a variety of terms, but
to date I have had no relavent hits.  Are you aware of any site or sites
that post such documents?  If you are and are able to share the
locations, I would appreciate the information.  If you are unaware of
any such sites, I will continue searching, and should I find any, I will
let you know.

Cordially,
Larry Barkley

Re: Music/Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0591.  Friday, 23 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 11:17:34 +0000 (HELP)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0588  Re: Music

[2]     From:   Juul Muller-van Santen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 22 May 1997 19:17:52
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0584  Re: Music/Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Hill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 11:17:34 +0000 (HELP)
Subject: 8.0588  Re: Music
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0588  Re: Music

"and the ice-cream ladies started along the isles".....well, this was in
the North-East of Scotland, so we only had aisles. Sorry.

        Harry Hill

[Editor's Note: My apologies to Harry Hill.  I am, in fact, the one
responsible for the interesting textual crux quoted above.  As I was
formatting the entry, I must have hit the delete key one too many times.
As most of you know, SHAKSPER comes to you with editorial intervention,
and with editorial intervention comes the possibility of electronic
transmission errors.  "O brave new world."  --Hardy

PS: If you are interested in what I do to bring you SHAKSPER, you may
want to read my 1997 SAA Paper for The Politics of Electronic Texts
seminar - "The Politics of an Academic Discussion Group."  To retrieve
this essay send the command - GET SAA1997 SHAKSPER - to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..]

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Juul Muller-van Santen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 22 May 1997 19:17:52
Subject: 8.0584  Re: Music/Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0584  Re: Music/Shakespeare

David Linley is interested in what the music "did" for the plays at
different times, a subject I have addressed re The TEMPEST in the
*Shakespeare Yearbook* for 1994 (ed. Holger Klein, pub. Mellen Press,
Lewiston NY). I share his fascination with the subject and am sure there
is a great deal more to be said about it.

Apart from long arias for Victorian Ariels which must have changed the
characterisation, some of these musics to the plays gave secondary
characters so much to sing that that itself surely changed the balance.
I too wonder why so little is written about this aspect.  Maybe because,
as David Linley writes, so much is unrecoverable.

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