1997

Re: Stoic Shakespeare; King Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0574.  Friday, 16 May 1997.

[1]     From:   Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 16 May 1997 11:16:53 +1200 (NZST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0555  Stoic Shakespeare

[2]     From:   Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 May 1997 20:37:12 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0563  Q: King Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Ward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 16 May 1997 11:16:53 +1200 (NZST)
Subject: 8.0555  Stoic Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0555  Stoic Shakespeare

To Ben Schneider's discusion of S morality:

Some threatening questions to any analysis of S's "morality": Can we
assume any stereotype of Elizabethan morality will be relevant?  Are we
of the opinion that S's "morality" followed or even addressed
stereotypes of the day?  Do we distinguish between social morality
(defined by human law and custom} and an absolute morality which some
believe lies above that?  If we go by internal evidence of the plays
etc. will we not easily confuse the views of the character with those of
the author?  Do we not assume that S had a "moral" message to convey?  S
was the supreme observer of humanity and could he not have let the
doings of humanity tell its own tale?  Did he have an axe to grind?

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 May 1997 20:37:12 +0100
Subject: 8.0563  Q: King Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0563  Q: King Lear

Do you mean 'melancholy' in the Burtonian sense? Is his path
predictable? Probably yes. BUT is this a problem? Is Lear's actual
madness all that important? That he goes mad is, that we see cause and
motive, yes, that he comes out of it and sees some consequences, yes,
that he learns some important truths through it - reason in madness-yes,
BUT the actual pathology of the madness a useful study? Imagery of the
mad scenes is vitally important, and what Lear says to Gloucester in
those clinically bleak chilly beach scenes (see the Scofield /Brook film
of this) is possibly the most crucial stuff he speaks in the whole
play.  So, mad??  Would Shak's definitions of madness be at all helpful
or even acceptable to us today? for an age that paid to see the mad
exercise in Bedlam, descriptions and diagnoses of madness are relative,
perhaps? I am reminded of the spectrum of madness in Hamlet, and the
wonderful shrug of shoulder in the Gravedigger's response to Hamlet that
he was mad 'even with losing his wits'. I think you have a true
minefield here, but a terrifically exciting one. A hand-grenade to
close: how about thinking through the notion that Lear ISN'T actually
made ever in the play? Not in our terms at all? Caused a stir in my
classes. My students think I am totally ...... mad for suggesting such
an idea?

Stuart Manger

Q: Productions of _Antony & Cleopatra_

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0573.  Friday, 16 May 1997.

From:           Don Weingust <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 May 1997 22:37:14 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Q: Productions of _Antony & Cleopatra_
In-Reply-To: <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

Dear SHAKSPERians,

For his work in progress, _The Masks of Antony & Cleopatra_, Professor
Marvin Rosenberg would appreciate hearing of any upcoming productions.
Please reply off-list to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Many thanks,
Don Weingust
University of California, Berkeley

New Sendmail in Place

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0571.  Friday, 16 May 1997.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, May 16, 1997
Subject:        New Sendmail in Place

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

Sendmail has been upgraded, but the only way we will be able to tell if
LISTSERV is operating properly is by sending out digests and examining
the error messages.

If you have not received mail in the past two weeks, please send the
following commands to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.:

GET SHAKSPER LOG9705A
GET SHAKSPER LOG9705B
GET SHAKSPER LOG9705C

I also would appreciate it if a few folks with AOL accounts and some of
you who did not receive mail until the temporary fix was in place a few
days ago, would reply to let me know if you have received this message.

Thanks for your patience,
Hardy

Re: Music/Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0572.  Friday, 16 May 1997.

[1]     From:   David Mycoff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 May 1997 19:01:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Music/Shakespeare

[2]     From:   David Mycoff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 16 May 1997 10:06:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Music for Shakespeare

[3]     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 14 May 1997 23:49:09 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0561 Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time

[4]     From:   Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 15 May 1997 20:27:35 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0561  Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Mycoff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 May 1997 19:01:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Music/Shakespeare

I'm responding to the query about settings by Shakespeare's
contemporaries.  Oxford University Press advertises a five-volume work,
A SHAKESPEARE MUSIC CATALOGUE, ed. Bryan N.S. Gooch and David Thatcher.
1991.   I've not been able to see this source, but surely other list
members have and can comment on its usefulness.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Mycoff <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 16 May 1997 10:06:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Music for Shakespeare

In a helpful response to the query about settings by Shakespeare's
contemporaries, Juul Muller-van Santen raises an interesting question
about "anachronistic music":  why would anyone want to hear
Shakespeare's poetry set to music from any other time?  I'm in the midst
of exam-grading, and so I must be brief, but a few thoughts occur that I
suspect many share.

 First, I don't see how anachronism in music is any more problematic
than anachronism in costuming or scene design, as long as the music
makes sense in the context of the total production. Second, just as the
history of critical responses to and stage productions of Shakespeare
makes interesting cultural history, so the history of musical responses,
interpretations, or appropriations.  Third, whenever we read and
interpret Shakespeare's text or produce it for the theatre, we are
staging an encounter between the visions and sensibilities that produced
the text and transmitted it and our own visions and sensibilities, and
this encounter inevitably involves anachronism, even when we attempt to
reconstruct something that has more or less claim to be called original
or period interpretation or performance.  It seems to me that the
tensions between what is old, alien, and past and what is our own are
part of the fascination of interpretation and performance.  And it seems
to me that  part of the value-educational, aesthetic, ideological, and
spiritual-of interpretation and performance issues from those tensions.
I suppose that I have what Brecht called "culinary tastes" in music, so
I am more moved by Finzi's settings than by Britten's, though I find
Britten's more intellectually challenging.  Both educate my response to
Shakespeare's language, however.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 14 May 1997 23:49:09 +0100
Subject: 8.0561 Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0561 Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time

Dire Straits: Romeo and Juliet
Spin Doctors: Cleopatra's Cat
Cole Porter: Brush up Your Shakespeare

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 15 May 1997 20:27:35 +0100
Subject: 8.0561  Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0561  Music to Shakespeare Songs from His Time

In UK, there is a very respected jazz composer and band leader called
John Dankworth. His wife is the seraphic Cleo Laine, quite one of the
most miraculous voices of our time. He wrote for her a series of
settings of Shakespeare Sonnets. Voice, lively mixed instrumental
backings / arrangements. Varieties of tempo, some exquisitely sensitive
to the rhythms and subtleties of the text. I am afraid that I do not own
mine now, and I am not sure under what flag it will be flying in US.
Definitely worth pursuing. And unusual too. Peggy Lee's 'Fever' has a
wonderfully irreverent verse about Romeo and Juliet?

Stuart Manger

The LISTSERV Upgrade and Sendmail Problem

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0570.  Thursday, 15 May 1997.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, May 15, 1997
Subject:        The LISTSERV Upgrade and Sendmail Problem

Dear SHAKSPEReans,

It took a few days to figure it out, but the upgrade to LISTSERV 1.8c
with its handy search function was incompatible with the mailer I was
using on the SUN workstation that is SHAKSPER's server.  As a result,
there have been really strange happenings going on.  Mail that has been
sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. has been delivered to other members.
All of the AOL accounts appear not to have received mail since the
upgrade about two weeks ago.  Also, mail was not being received at many
other accounts with no pattern that could have assisted us in solving
the problem.

The other day we came up with a temporary fix to get mail to most of
those who have been cut off.  Tomorrow we install the latest version of
Sendmail on the Sun.  We will also probably need to recompile and
configure LISTSERV.  These are major undertaking.  I hope that all will
go smoothly, and SHAKSPER will be back in service after a several hours
hiatus, but I would not count on it.

After I am back in business(whenever that may be), I'll send out another
message with instructions for those who missed out on the past two weeks
of discussions and who did not get the files I send a few days ago.

If you have been the recipient of any of these bizarre mailings or if
you have been receiving two copies of digests since the temporary fix,
your trials should soon be over.  Thanks for your patience.

Wish us luck,
Hardy

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