Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: December ::
Re: Hamlet as Gertrude's Heir; Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1217.  Monday, 8 December 1997.

[1]     From:   Nicholas R Moschovakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 5 Dec 1997 14:38:55 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1156 Re: Hamlet as Gertrude's Heir

[2]     From:   Skip Nicholson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 05 Dec 1997 18:38:43 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas R Moschovakis <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 5 Dec 1997 14:38:55 -0600
Subject: 8.1156 Re: Hamlet as Gertrude's Heir
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1156 Re: Hamlet as Gertrude's Heir

For a different but fascinating ironic revision of the Hamlet story with
a heroic Claudius, see Cavafy's narrative poem (translated by Edmund
Keeley and Philip Sherrard under the title of "King Claudius" in their
Princeton UP volume).

>From:           Kristine Batey <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >

>In one of my undergrad courses, the prof suggested that "Hamlet" is
>really a tragedy about Claudius, given a quarter turn. Try switching the
>perspective, and think what the play would be like as Claudius the
>central character:

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 05 Dec 1997 18:38:43 -0800
Subject:        Re: Sonnets

After following the debates over the complete works editions, I don't
know if anything can be called "definitive" any more, but Stephen
Booth's edition of the sonnets with commentary (Yale UP) has to come as
close as is still possible.

Skip Nicholson
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.