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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: December ::
Re: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1227.  Thursday, 11 December 1997.

[1]     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 97 10:11:48 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1223  Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

[2]     From:   AEB Coldiron <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 10:34:48 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

[3]     From:   James L. Harner <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 09:37:30 -0600
        Subj:   Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

[4]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 18:47:11 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 8.1223  Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

[5]     From:   Scott Crozier <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 09:00:19 +1100
        Subj:   Using IT to Teach Shakespeare


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 97 10:11:48 EST
Subject: 8.1223  Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1223  Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

At the University of Georgia English Department, those of us who teach
Shakespeare have put together a collection of materials. These include
exercises that use electronic texts, handy links, and suggestions for
researching and writing about Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

The URL is http://parallel.park.uga.edu/dept/resources.html and we would
very much welcome feedback. The material that we include is designed for
both secondary students as well as university students.

Fran Teague

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           AEB Coldiron <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 10:34:48 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

Alan Perry asks for our experiences with integrating technology into the
Shakespeare classroom, as he embarks on an experiment with his 12th
grade students.

I designed a course called "Multimedia Shakespeare" using the resources
you name (and ideally, a Hinman collator! heh).  The course took its
solitary way through committees, where, I am told, it may emerge,
approved, some time next year.  The course, designed for first-years in
a comprehensive university, is part of a "GenEd" set called "Using
Information Effectively" in which the goal is to help students apply
technology to actual course content (rather than just learning empty
skills-sets).  I still have a number of reservations about this, though
I did my best to design a reasonable course that would deploy
technologies as tools, not as ends unto themselves, and would do it with
some discretion;  but, well, talk to me after it is approved and
taught.  One of the most obvious problems is that our students tend to
come to us not using tech very well if at all, so syllabus space has to
be devoted to basics (how to use e-mail in a discussion group, how to do
various kinds of net searches, how to judge the quality of search
results, how to annotate with CD-ROMS, etc). One can't do the kind of
14-play semester some profs manage in a text-based course.  (With first
years I would cut back anyway, but there are serious syllabus losses
here, and thus selection becomes the more important.)  With 12th
graders, I imagine those issues would be even more pressing-how many
plays, two or three in a semester to do them well and fully, integrating
all kinds of tech? And which ones, and why those? You say _Hamlet_ and
_Macbeth_, but if you want to compare film performances, why not
_Hamlet_ and _R&J_: the Baz Luhrmann version will surely rivet your 12th
graders' attention so that you can focus it on some very interesting
issues of cultural distance and reception.  A chacun son gout, I guess,
but selection is key.

I have heard that Professor Jean Brink, Arizona State, whom I do not
know but whose work on Spenser I admire, will be designing a similar
course, or maybe already has done so.  If you like I shall try to pass
your query to her, or you could wait and see if that work will become
more public in the near future. And I imagine she's not the only one.
Wasn't there notice of a conference on this topic recently?

In my upper-division course I've already tried injecting limited bits of
tech, and I find that it works best when the technology is clearly
subordinated to larger goals in the course (e.g., video is nice, but
it's best when you cue up specific clips briefly to make a specific
point about how camera angles/blocking/etc alter the significance of a
scene;  video is a waste of time when you sit students in front of long
minutes of tape without specific questions, linked to topics already
under consideration, posed clearly in advance).  The play's the thing
(of course, even if catching not royal consciences but young minds), and
the technology, no matter how fancy, is only a tool, like a book or an
apron stage, with which to give the play life for them.

Hope that helps. Let us know how it goes.

A. Coldiron

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James L. Harner <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 09:37:30 -0600
Subject:        Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

The pedagogy section of the annual World Shakespeare Bibliography and
the +World Bibliography on CD-ROM+ includes numerous articles on using
video and other electronic media in teaching Shakespeare.

James L. Harner
Editor, World Shakespeare Bibliography
Texas A&M University

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Dec 1997 18:47:11 +0000
Subject: Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare
Comment:        SHK 8.1223  Q: Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

I am sorry for being commercial, but my company published a booklet that
may help.  This book is not specific to Shakespeare.  You will not find
Shakespearean web sites listed.

It is called MAYFIELD'S QUICK VIEW GUIDE TO THE INTERNET FOR STUDENTS OF
ENGLISH by Jennifer Campbell and Michael Keene.  It teaches how to use
the Internet as a resource and how to write papers using those sources.
It covers topics like judging the reliability of Internet information,
documenting information from electronic sources, MLA style, etc.

It retails for $7.95, or is free when shrink wrapped with any Mayfield
title.  We do not publish anything for Shakespeare classes, I'm afraid,
but this may help those who teach other classes.

You may receive a complimentary copy to see if this is something you
want to add to your students reading list IF you are a professor
currently employed by a college or university in the United States.
Please call the Mayfield sales department at (800) 433-1279 or fax a
desk copy request on school letterhead to (650) 960-0328.

Sorry for the commercial.  I hope this low cost book can help.

Alan, I know you teach High School, not college.  Contact me off list
and I'll send a copy to you.

All the best,
Mike Jensen

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Crozier <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 09:00:19 +1100
Subject:        Using IT to Teach Shakespeare

Although the best source for the study of Shakespeare is the texts
themselves, I have found the following to be of some assistance.  First,
using the search facility on the MIT site allows students to study the
effects of repeated tropes in the plays.  The word love, for example,
appears in Othello more than in any other play.  Furthermore, it appears
more in the Iago's tempting of Othello than in any other place.  The
sites that deal with Elizabethan acting and staging are also very
useful.  The Reading University site is extremely good.  Online
discussion than is offered on some sites is useful for students who
really find the plays exciting.  They can discuss ideas with peers in an
international setting.

Regards,
Scott Crozier
 

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