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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: December ::
Re: Queen Lear; Shylock
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1229.  Friday, 12 December 1997.

[1]     From:   Skip Shand <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 10:41:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

[2]     From:   Rosalind King <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 17:18:39 GMT0BST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

[3]     From:   Milla Riggio <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 14:23:28 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

[4]     From:   G. L. Horton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 11:27:44
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

[5]     From:   Tiffany Rasovic <
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        Date:   Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 14:25:49 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1228  Re: Shylock


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 10:41:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

Richard Rose's Necessary Angel Theatre Company in Toronto has twice
presented a female Lear in recent years, first as a completely
gender-reversed workshop with Patricia Hamilton in the title role, and
then as a full production, gender-blind rather than simply reversed,
this time starring Janet Wright.

In both cases, Lear was played as King, costuming attempted to be
neutral so that the gendered body was (theoretically!) taken out of the
game, and the main 'discoveries' centred on a (stereotypical?) new
nurturing quality found in the later relationship between Lear and
Cordelia, so that their scene as they go into captivity together becomes
frankly the most moving scene in the play.

The other main benefit of this take, not surprisingly, was that the
women who got to play roles like Cornwall and Edmund (the latter was
played by the magnificent Maggie Huculak in both productions), found
themselves gifted with a level of bald power and agency that women in
the classics rarely get to explore. Patricia Hamilton observed at one
point that she had given up playing Shakespeare for 30 years because she
was tired of putting on a fancy dress and entering to music!

Skip Shand

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rosalind King <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 17:18:39 GMT0BST
Subject: 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

Yes, sorry! Peter is right  Leicester Haymarket was the originating
theatre. I saw it at the Young Vic.

Rosalind

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 14:23:28 -0400
Subject: 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

The most interesting Queen Lear, or rather MOTHER LEAR, that I have read
(haven't seen it) is in the HOUSE OF LEAR by Reginald Jackson, a text
that sets the play in the transvestite House Culture of New York, at a
Ball.  Teaching this text (which is not published and so hard to get)
with PARIS IS BURNING, as an adaptation of Lear was a very powerful
combination.

Milla Riggio

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           G. L. Horton <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 11:27:44
Subject: 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1226  Re: Queen Lear

My AisleSay review of this "Company of Women" production of "King Lear"
is on my Web Site.

<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

click on Reviews in the index.  The reviews are alphabetical by title of
play, not chronological or by theatre company.

G.L.Horton -- Newton, MA, USA

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<http://www.tiac.net/users/ghorton>

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tiffany Rasovic <
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Date:           Thursday, 11 Dec 1997 14:25:49 +0000
Subject: 8.1228  Re: Shylock
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1228  Re: Shylock

I recently read a book which gives an interesting run down of the
history of Jews in Europe and their parallel treatment in
theater-especially Barabas and Shylock: *Shylock: A Legend and its
Legacy* by John Gross  Simon and Schuster 1992.

TR
 

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