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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: December ::
Re: Technology; Anti-Semitism; Doubt
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1236.  Wednesday, 17 December 1997.

[1]     From:   Mike Sirofchuck <
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        Date:   Monday, 15 Dec 1997 07:01:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1231  Re: Shakespeare Concordances (E-Texts)

[2]     From:   Stevie Simkin <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Dec 1997 14:14:02 -0000
        Subj:   Re: Anti-Semitism: Shakespeare, Marlowe

[3]     From:   Chris Kendall <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 16 Dec 1997 12:30:39 -0700
        Subj:   Reasonable Doubt


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Sirofchuck <
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Date:           Monday, 15 Dec 1997 07:01:30 -0800
Subject: 8.1231  Re: Shakespeare Concordances (E-Texts)
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1231  Re: Shakespeare Concordances (E-Texts)

>Ever ,
>Steve Inaccessabilowitz

>(For some of us, "getting up to speed" with contemporary technology
>still means that we have yet to figure out which end of the pencil to
>put into the electric sharpener.)

They make electric ones now?

Mike Sirofchuck

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stevie Simkin <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Dec 1997 14:14:02 -0000
Subject:        Re: Anti-Semitism: Shakespeare, Marlowe

I recently responded to some discussion of anti-Semitism in Merchant of
Venice with an announcement that I was directing a production of
Marlowe's The Jew of Malta which attempts to turn the play's
anti-Semitism inside out by using it as a play within a play:  our
"outer" play being set in Warsaw at the time the  ghetto was being set
up in 1939, with the "inner" play, Marlowe's text, being performed at
the behest of the Nazi authorities.  The Jewish actors,  forced to
perform Marlowe's anti-Semitic stereotypes, work to subvert the dominant
reading of the play by various ingenious means which leads us to
manipulate the text shamelessly, while keeping the words of the text
pretty much intact.  As the play switches between the 1939 and the
Elizabethan contexts, all kinds of interesting things emerge about how
ethnic identities are constructed, imposed and resisted.

The production, which seems to have been a success, is now over.
Following one performance, there was a colloquium with a panel made up
of a number of academics plus a reverend (advisor to the Bishop of
Winchester on Interfaith Relations) and the chair of the local
Southampton Reform Jewish Community.  A fiery, fascinating debate
ensued.

I am currently writing up the production and colloquium for
publication.  (In addition, a review of the play should be forthcoming
in Cahiers Elisabethains). If anyone would be interested in seeing the
work in progress on the article at some point during the next 4-6 weeks,
please contact me off-list.  I'd also be interested in placing the
finished article on SHAKSPER, and possibly the adapted script, if there
is enough interest, but I would like advice on copyright issues before I
pursue this.  In addition, it may be that the link here is too tenuous:
I don't want to be clogging up valuable Shakespearean cyberspace with
things Marlovian if this is inappropriate.  Being a relatively recent
subscriber here, any advice would be welcome.

Thanks for listening

Stevie Simkin

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[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Kendall <
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Date:           Tuesday, 16 Dec 1997 12:30:39 -0700
Subject:        Reasonable Doubt

Sorry for the late posting on this subject, but I've just been catching
up on my SHAKSPER Digest. If "1 in 1 billion" individuals might share
the same set of genetic markers, then it's likely that 2 or 3 people now
living could be the source of the genetic material. It's unreasonable to
assume that they live in Tibet or Patagonia, because they would have to
come from the same gene pool, or there would be numerous differences in
genetic markers. So we're faced with the possibility that someone else
from the same geographic area (perhaps the same family) is the source of
the genetic material. In the absence of other compelling evidence, I
think that would be reasonable doubt. If the figure is "1 in 100
billion" that's something else again.
 

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