Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: December ::
Re: The inconstant moon
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1261.  Monday, 29 December 1997.

[1]     From:   Marilyn A. Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 26 Dec 1997 10:23:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1256: R&J and RII

[2]     From:   Michael Yogev <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 28 Dec 1997 00:48:57 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1253  Re: The inconstant moon


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn A. Bonomi <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 26 Dec 1997 10:23:23 -0500
Subject: 8.1256: R&J and RII
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1256: R&J and RII

First, thank you to all the kind responders-my students are fascinated
that people actually get on the 'Net and DISCUSS stuff like this-what an
education opportunity!

Brad Morris suggests adding RII to the MND/R&J mix.  While I can see
pairing the comedy/tragedy duo, I don't see the connection otherwise.
Richard is no adolescent, nor is Bullingbrook.  There are no parallel
feud/love pairings, no fairies nor flights.  Divine right of kings does
not motivate either Theseus or Prince Escalus-and in neither of the
other two is the legitimacy of the English monarch the central issue.
While I am fascinated with the deposition scene and Richard's physical
handling of the crown, I see no strong way to tie that scene
thematically or in terms of character to the crucial moments in either
of the other two plays.

On the other hand, in a graduate course on Shakespeare focusing on the
early plays, the CONTRASTS among these three pieces would be a
fascinating study, on such levels as language, political implications,
connections between the plays and the company members, the role of the
women in each case (tougher in RII!), etc. etc.

Yours,
Marilyn B.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Yogev <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 28 Dec 1997 00:48:57 +0200
Subject: 8.1253  Re: The inconstant moon
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1253  Re: The inconstant moon

David Small wrote that myth "Is, after all, such stuff as dreams are
made of."

I think Prospero's line is ever so much more intriguing if rendered as
actually penned, "such stuff as dreams are made ON"-changes the dynamics
a good deal, and certainly the tone of the line that follows: "And our
little lives are rounded with a sleep."

Diana has indeed been the sort of myth dreams are made on: problem is,
the dreams have been too often concerned with controlling the woman
rather than releasing the person to free movement and decisions.  Both
R&J and MSD feature the commonplace male inability to see women,
particularly their daughters, as fully human beings with minds of their
own.  Old story, still true.

Michael Yogev
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.