1997

Re: DNA Evidence; Line Numbers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1207.  Wednesday, 26 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 16:01:48 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1201  DNA Evidence

[2]     From:   William P Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 16:20:01 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1203 Line Numbers


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 16:01:48 -0500
Subject: 8.1201  DNA Evidence
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1201  DNA Evidence

>But with two billion of us on
>Earth, two persons might easily share a one-in-a-billion pattern.
>Reasonable doubt?

On the contrary, I think this is exactly the kind of doubt we mean to
disregard by using the "reasonable" qualifier.

In court we don't normally deal with the population of Earth.  It's a
relative handful of people who could possibly be involved in a given
series of events, and a much smaller number who are likely to be.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William P Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 16:20:01 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.1203 Line Numbers
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1203 Line Numbers

In the case of line numbers in Shakespeare it makes a difference if the
text is verse or prose, if the editors have done any re-lining, whether
sections have been emended in or out, and similar considerations.  In
the case of prose, the page width of the edition will dictate the line
numbering.  Gone are the days when the "old" Cambridge edition's numbers
were the norm.

William Proctor Williams
English/NIU
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Qs: Shakespearean Productions

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1206.  Wednesday, 26 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Joseph Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 12:37:48 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare in Atlanta

[2]     From:   Nicholas R Moschovakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 14:20:18 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1200  Nashville *Hamlet*


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nicholas R Moschovakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 14:20:18 -0600
Subject: 8.1200  Nashville *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1200  Nashville *Hamlet*

Hey - I wish I had known about this in time to attend it. Any
Shakespeare at all in my new Middle Tennessee environs (short of the
summer festival in Atlanta) is something I would like to hear about; but
it's not worth subscribing to a Nashville paper just for the
entertainment listings. Is there any kind of national web-based
clearinghouse for announcements of current Shakespeare productions? And
if not, might we not use this list in the future, to pass on the word
concerning notable (semi-pro or pro) performances in our respective
areas? - Nick Moschovakis

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joseph Tate <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 12:37:48 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Shakespeare in Atlanta

Last year around this time, I happened upon a very entertaining
production of *The Tempest* in Atlanta at the Shakespeare Tavern.

I'm headed that way once again, and wondering if anyone has information
on what the Shakespeare Tavern might be playing currently.

Thanks,
Joseph Tate
Graduate Student
Department of English
U. of Washington, Seattle

Qs: Jaques and Hamlet; Line Numbers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1203.  Tuesday, 25 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Ryan Asmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Nov 1997 17:56:08 -0500
        Subj:   Jaques and Hamlet

[2]     From:   Cristina Keunecke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 13:45:03 -0800
        Subj:   Q: Line Numbers in Different Editions of the Plays


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ryan Asmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Nov 1997 17:56:08 -0500
Subject:        Jaques and Hamlet

Dear All,

I was wondering if anyone would be able to recommend to me an article or
two, or perhaps a book, that makes mention of the similarities in
character between Jaques from "As You Like It" and Hamlet?  In some
ways, as I see it, Jaques seems almost a prototype of the melancholy
Dane: with respect to how he sees the world, how other characters see
him, etc.  I'm interested in going into this a bit in depth for a paper
I have to write, and wanted to run it by all of you (our library here at
B.U. being less than helpful on the subject).

I've taken what I think to be a fairly good run through the SHAKSPER
files and, unfortunately, haven't come up with much relevant
information...

Yours,
Ryan

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cristina Keunecke <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 13:45:03 -0800
Subject:        Q: Line Numbers in Different Editions of the Plays

I would like to ask if someone knows something about the following
'problem': Comparing two editions of the same play (New
Shakespeare-Cambridge University Press, edited by J.Dover Wilson x
Editions available in the Public Domain-MIT Server), I  have percived
that there are differences in the line numbers in both editions.
Although the copies available at the MIT server don't have the line
numbers edited, I can see that a specific line has not the same number
that the same line in the Cambridge Edition.  Is this possible or a
commom fact ? Does this fact occour in other editions of the plays ?

Thanks in advance.
Cristina Keunecke
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Re: Gallathea

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1204.  Wednesday, 26 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 15:41:46 -0700
        Subj:   Gallathea

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Nov 1997 00:28:01 +0
        Subj:   Re: Gallathea

[3]     From:   Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 26 Nov 1997 10:55:05 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1201  Re: Gallathea


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Orgel <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 15:41:46 -0700
Subject:        Gallathea

Adrian Kiernander obviously isn't blowing his own horn, but he directed
a splendid Gallathea with schoolboys in Armidale (Australia)--about 20
minutes of it are on tape, and the boys are astonishingly good.

s. orgel

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Nov 1997 00:28:01 +0
Subject:        Re: Gallathea

There was an amateur production of Gallathea by the students of the
Shakespeare Institute of the University of Birmingham in Stratford UK in
the summer of 1994. The librarian of the Institute, James Shaw, would be
the person to contact to get access to a video recording of one of the
performances, and his email address can be had from the university
webpage at http://www.bham.ac.uk

Gabriel Egan

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Holland <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 26 Nov 1997 10:55:05 GMT
Subject: 8.1201  Re: Gallathea
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1201  Re: Gallathea

There has been a more recent production of Lyly's *Gallathea* than the
one Lisa Hopkins mentioned. The play was performed in June 1994 by
students of the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon in the
Institute's gardens. There is a review by Sue Knott in issue 2 (1994) of
*The Mason Croft Review*, the Institute's in-house magazine. More
important for all those thousands of people who are fascinated by Lyly
but have never seen the play, the production was video'd and can be
watched in the Institute's library. Anyone who wants to know more should
contact the Librarian at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Rooky/Roaky Wood

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1202.  Tuesday, 25 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 08:35:42 -0500
        Subj:   Rooky wood etc

[2]     From:   Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 09:58:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1196  Re: Rooky/Roaky


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 08:35:42 -0500
Subject:        Rooky wood etc.

William Empson made the point long ago (in 1930) that Macbeth is himself
in some sense the crow, making his silent, sinister way to the 'rooky
wood' where the creatures on whom he will viciously fall  prepare
noisily and innocently for sleep. Of course, rooks are also  crows. But
as a man here turns against humanity, so nature turns against itself.
The distinction permitted by the use of the two words is between rooks,
who 'live in a crowd and are mainly vegetarian', and the solitary
carrion crow, one of 'night's black agents' who aims to wreak havoc
amongst them. This 'subdued pun' also hints at an opposite impulse: the
crow's wish ultimately to be united with the rookery, or Macbeth's
peculiar sense that by murdering Banquo he will somehow fulfill a larger
human destiny. As king, he will be a crow amongst rooks. The
ambiguities, ironies and bloody-minded double-think attendant on the
institution of Monarchy in Britain are of course all operating here. The
appalling scenes and outbursts accompanying the death of the 'people's
princess' indicate that they are still current.  In a later comment,
Empson disarmingly allows that 'Obviously the passage is still
impressive if you have no opinions at all about the difference between
crows and rooks'. ( See his Seven Types of Ambiguity, London, Chatto
1930: 3rd edition Penguin Books, Harmondsworth 1961, pp. 37-9)

Terence Hawkes

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Rusche <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 25 Nov 1997 09:58:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.1196  Re: Rooky/Roaky
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1196  Re: Rooky/Roaky

Re: The rooky wood.  I have not noticed, but has anyone mentioned
William Empson's discussion of the passage from _Macbeth_ in his _Seven
Types of Ambiguity_?  It is worth looking at.

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