Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Iago/R3; Bogus; PBS H5; Gay Merchant; Accents;
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1116.  Wednesday, 5 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Tanya Gough <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Nov 1997 10:01:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Iago vs Richard

[2]     From:   David Evett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Nov 1997 12:49:34 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1114  Re: Assorted Macbeth Postings

[3]     From:   Don Weingust <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 04 Nov 1997 22:36:52 -0800
        Subj:   Globe's Henry V on PBS

[4]     From:   Werner Habicht <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 12:54:14 +0200
        Subj:   SKS 8.1070 Gay Merchant

[5]     From:   Jonathan Hope <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 08:26:18 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1070  Eliz Accents

[6]     From:   Jonathan Hope <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 09:07:49 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1082  Re: Macbeth / Children


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tanya Gough <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Nov 1997 10:01:15 -0500
Subject:        Re: Iago vs Richard

>Is there a relevant difference between a villain who
>threatens on a merely personal level (Iago, Caliban (?), Don John) and
>someone who threatens society's foundation (R3, Macbeth)?

Peter Hadorn makes an interesting, but highly revelatory point, and I am
fascinated by his use of the word "merely."  To me the question lies in
whether "evil" in these particular instances should be determined by the
highest body count, or in the villain's ability to corrupt.  Richard's
followers seek their own personal gain, and their affiliation reveals an
inherent immorality which validates their ultimate loss.  Those who
oppose Richard are killed, BUT they retain their innocence and faith - a
point which, in Shakespeare's time would have at least guaranteed them a
place in heaven.

Iago, on the other hand, takes innocent people and forces an individual
hell upon them.  He forces good people to perform heinous deeds on his
behalf by feeding them lies.  And in Cassio's case, damages his
reputation beyond repair (or, at least until the plot has run its
course), which vindicates Iago's perceived attack on his own reputation
when he is passed over as Othello's lieutenant.

Vis-a-vis the question of Branagh vs. McKellan,  I found Branagh's Iago
was played with a straightforward determination, which did not veer from
his ultimate goals of revenge.  His manipulation is transparent, at
least from the audience's perspective. I must admit, however,  that
Branagh presents one moment of true humanity when Othello finally
buckles under his insinuations and embraces Iago as his only friend, and
Branagh's eyes fill with tears and misery.  On the other hand,
McKellan's Richard has a much more difficult task - make himself
attractive to people who find him both morally and physically
repulsive.  And he accomplishes this task admirably - I personally found
him much more "likable" than Branagh's Iago.  Thus I pose the following
question to all you 3 am philosophers: which is worse, to corrupt people
who trust you, or to force people who hate you to find you irresistible?

Tanya Gough

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Nov 1997 12:49:34 -0500
Subject: 8.1114  Re: Assorted Macbeth Postings
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1114  Re: Assorted Macbeth Postings

Among persiflageous scholarship on Shakespeare there is a charming essay
by Alfred Harbage (actually an address to the annual banquet the
Shakespeare Association used to have) which gives the text of some
hitherto unknown letters purportedly come into Harbage's hands.  It's
reprinted in his *Conceptions of Shakespeare", 1966.

Dave Evett

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Weingust <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 04 Nov 1997 22:36:52 -0800
Subject:        Globe's Henry V on PBS

Greetings all,

I believe there was mention on this list that the program about the
Shakespeare's Globe HV would be aired on November 5th.  While that might
be the case in some markets, the PBS affiliate in San Francisco, KQED,
have scheduled the program for Thanksgiving night.  Their program
listing follows:

GREAT PERFORMANCES #2302 HENRY V AT SHAKESPEARE'S GLOBE
     11/27/97 8:00 PM CC ST length - 0:56:46
celebrates the rebirth of the English-speaking theater's most revered
playhouse. Mark Rylance, acclaimed actor and the Globe's artistic
director, portrays the young king who leads the English to victory over
the French at Agincourt. Performed in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II
at the theater's official June 12, 1997, opening, the Act IV excerpts
are preceded by the play's famed prologue, recited by actress Zoe
Wannamaker in tribute to her late [father].

Cheers,
Don Weingust
UC Berkeley

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Habicht <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 12:54:14 +0200
Subject:        SKS 8.1070 Gay Merchant

Has anyone seen that a gay relationship between A. and B. was balanced
by a lesbian relationship between Portia and Nerissa? One production
that achieved such an equilibrium was performed in Frankfurt in 1993.

W.H.

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 08:26:18 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.1070  Eliz Accents
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1070  Eliz Accents

>1)  Is there any sort of consensus on how the British (well, London at
>least) accent of Shakespeare's time sounded? Was it in fact close to
>American Southern?

(a)     sort-of - see Charles Barber, 1997, *Early Modern English*
(Edinburgh University Press) chapter on phonology, and the references
there to Dobson's work.
(b) no

>2)  What is your opinion on the issue of using British accents in
>current productions of Shakespeare? Does it lend the text something that
>an American accent would lack? My own feeling as a director is that it
>couldn't matter less, and that the use of accents should be a
>directorial choice based on the needs of the production, but you
>wouldn't believe the arguments I've had over this.

Of course it shouldn't matter, but people are people, and we all react
irrationally to accents.  Some audiences will have been trained to
expect RP English in Shakespeare and nothing else - others will find
that laughable.  We can't recreate 'Shakespearean' accents, and even if
we could, we can't recreate a sense in the audience of what they would
have meant (in social terms) - so better to follow your own instinct.

Good luck,
Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jonathan Hope <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 09:07:49 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 8.1082  Re: Macbeth / Children
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1082  Re: Macbeth / Children

Polanski's Macbeth is indeed dedicated to Sharon Tate.  The spookiness
of the film, and in particular the children, is, however somewhat
undercut for British audiences of a certain age by the casting of a very
young Keith Chegwin as Banquo's son.  Keith, of course went on to do his
best work as a member of Noel Edmonds' Saturday Morning Swap Shop team,
not to mention the classic 'Cheggers Plays Pop'.  He then lived the
celebrity lifestyle to the full, marrying his Swap Shop co-star Maggie
Philbin, descending into drink problems, and making a triumphant
recovery.

No doubt videos of these performances are available from BBC enterprises
for the Chegwin completists out there.

Jonathan Hope
Middlesex University
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.