1997

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1119.  Thursday, 6 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Hayley Grill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 18:56:26 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 2 Nov 1997 to 3 Nov 1997

[2]     From:   Nely Keinanen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 6 Nov 1997 12:43:37 +0200
        Subj:   Henry 5


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hayley Grill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Nov 1997 18:56:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: SHAKSPER Digest - 2 Nov 1997 to 3 Nov 1997

Try looking under feminism first - I did my undergraduate thesis, a
large part of it anyway, on their relationship try anything by Lenze,
Green, Neely.

Hope that gives you a place to begin

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nely Keinanen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 6 Nov 1997 12:43:37 +0200
Subject:        Henry 5

Dear SHAKSPEReans:

I've been teaching Henry 5, and one of my students asked whether it is
significant that Henry pays Montjoy for delivering his message to the
French king, "There's for thy labour, Montjoy" (3.6.157).  Would it have
been standard practice for an opposing king to pay the other's
messenger, either in the early 15th or in the late 16th centuries?  Is
this gesture meant to highlight Henry's magnanimity?  Might it also be
meant as an ironic contrast to Henry's attempt to pay off Williams in
4.8, where Williams refuses Henry's money?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Nely Keinanen
Department of English
University of Helsinki

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.