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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: Tipping; Doubling; Running; Accenting; Presenting
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1126.  Sunday, 9 November 1997.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 07 Nov 1997 15:25:45 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1122  Re: H5 and tipping

[2]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:08:52 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   DREAM in Baltimore

[3]     From:   Jon Velz <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:26:10 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Enter running

[4]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:47:04 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Northcountry locutions

[5]     From:   Shaula Evans <
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        Date:   Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 00:29:36 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: Hamlet/Ophelia


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 07 Nov 1997 15:25:45 -0500
Subject: 8.1122  Re: H5 and tipping
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1122  Re: H5 and tipping

David Evett writes:

>At any rate,
>Henry's gift does display his generosity-but I think early modern
>spectators would not have seen it as exceptional, nor as in any way
>reflecting invidiously on anybody else.

I believe we should think in terms of "service."  If the U.S. has a
service economy, Renaissance England had one in spades. And those served
tipped those who did the serving. Duncan, e.g., tips Macbeth's staff.
Many of us still follow this custom and tip those who render us good
service.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:08:52 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        DREAM in Baltimore

A footnote to Jim Lusardi's ref to the doubling of Theseus/Oberon,
Hippolyta/Titania in Peter Brook production of MND.  In order to bring
off this coup, Brook had to rearrange scenes in the fourth act to cover
the costume change for Oberon and Titania who enter, as the text stands,
as Theseus and Hippolyta a few seconds after they exit as O. & Titania.
So we can guess that Sh. did not intend the doubling.  But that is no
objection.  Sh. had never heard of Freud either, and yet Brook
brilliantly made Oberon & Titania work out in dreams the hostility
between Theseus and Hippolyta (which, notice, is absent in Act V).
Doubling should score points, not just conserve on casting costs.  Sh.
makes it tell in JC where the murder of Cinna the Poet covers the
costume change for bloodied Caesar who comes out in a clean toga as
Octavius in Act 4 scene 1.  My own fantasy is to direct a Measure for
Measure that doubles the roles of Angelo and his alter ego Claudio.  I
dreamed once I cast identical twins in those roles.  Note that Angelo
and Claudio are on each other's minds a lot but never meet until Act V
where Claudio enters as "yon muffled fellow".  Same thing happens in WT,
where in nineteenth c. actress(es?) doubled the roles of Hermione and
Perdita, who has no lines in Act V where she appears for first time with
her mother, Hermione.  Just put a reasonable look alike into her costume
and send her out on stage to participate in the statue scene.

Cheers,
John Velz

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jon Velz <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:26:10 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Enter running

Syd Kasten's suggested staging for Isabella's entrance in MM 4.1 is
interesting, but we must remember that she is a would-be nun to whom
eternity is more real than time.  Would she run to Mariana's house when
she knows her only by report? Would she use the latinate "circummured"
for walled 'round if she were breathless?  And speaking of Mariana's
house, Kasten has taken the passage on Mariana in 3.1 to mean that she
is at St.  Luke's church door.  Not so.  She is at the moated grange
(ditched farmhouse) that is in St. Luke's parish; she and Isabella and
the Friar confer in her garden, where Mariana has heard the boy sing the
melancholy love song.

Cheers
John W. Velz

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 01:47:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Northcountry locutions

To Andrew Walker White's interest in a Northern dialect for Sh.

Joseph Crosby suggested that the "rooky wood" in *Macbeth* should be the
*roaky wood*.  Roke or roak is smoke in northern dialect; the allusion
would be to the swirling fog (cf "fog and filthy air" at beginning of
the play) in a thicket of trees at sunset.  Crosby was born and raised
in what we now call Cumbria in the Eden River Valley south of Penrith
and north of Appleby. This is near the Scottish border and he
occasionally suggests Sh.  readings based on Scots dialect.  See J. W.
Velz and Frances N. Teague, eds. *One Touch of Shakespeare: Letters of
Joseph Crosby to Joseph Parker Norris 1875-1878*  Folger Sh. Lib. and
Associated Univ. Presses, 1986. esp index.

Cheers
John Velz

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Shaula Evans <
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Date:           Sunday, 9 Nov 1997 00:29:36 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Re: Hamlet/Ophelia

>What has struck me as quite unusual and surprising in these discussions
>on Shakespeare's plays is the tendency to read abnormal/unnatural (I am
>quite hesitant over the choice of words, I hope I am giving offense to
>nobody) forms of love, e.g. incestuous or homosexual, into what seem to
>me to be the most perfectly obvious and natural relationships between
>fathers and daughters, brothers and sisters, friends of the same gender,
>etc.
(long snip)
> I think that maybe in the west (pardon the huge
>generalization), where family bonds are somewhat more relax, Laertes's
>attitude is rather difficult to accept, but maybe in Shakespeare's time,
>family ties were rather more similar to eastern countries today.

I suspect that from an academic point of view, you might be right.

However, speaking as an actor/director, one of the challenges of
presenting Shakespeare on stage is to take plays written in a particular
society/culture/time period, and make them relevant and interesting to a
modern audience.  So, if I am part of a Shakespeare play in Canada,
relying primarily on strong family bonds to explain the motivations of
characters probably would not create a strong production for a Canadian
audience-whereas it sounds from your post like this might be a natural
and obvious approach for a production in Iran.

Shaula
 

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