Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Qs: Hamlet/Gertrude; Arden Sonnets; No Matter
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1138.  Wednesday, 12 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Jeri McIntosh <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Nov 1997 19:49:05 -0500
        Subj:   Hamlet as Gertrude's heir

[2]     From:   Barrett Graves <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Nov 1997 18:27:32 -0700
        Subj:   Help Locating Distributor of an Arden Shakespeare Title

[3]     From:   Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 12 Nov 1997 01:35:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1128  No Matter


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jeri McIntosh <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Nov 1997 19:49:05 -0500
Subject:        Hamlet as Gertrude's heir

Forgive me if the following topic is already well-worn in this list. As
a newcomer to both the list and to literary criticism, I'm liable to
push on doors opened long ago.

Recently, on the Albion list, there was thread on why Hamlet did not
succeed Claudius.  Most of the discussion involved 10th century Danish
inheritance practices but I found myself wondering if Shakespeare may
have had a 16thC English context in my mind.  The contemporary context
for this could be the discussion of Elizabeth I's possible marriages to
foreign princes and the actual marriage contract of Mary Tudor and
Philip of Spain.  In this contract, it was stipulated that should there
be issue of the marriage, they would succeed to the English throne only
upon the death of Mary, not of Philip.

Is it possible that Gertrude was intended to be understood as a femme
sole heiress of the Danish throne and that Hamlet Sr. and later Claudius
derived their kingly title from their marriage to her.  In this
scenario, Claudius does not succeed to the throne upon the murder of his
brother but upon his marriage to Gertrude to whom he refers as
"th'imperial jointress of this our warlike state."  Therefore, the
question of Hamlet's succession rests upon the death of Gertrude, not of
his father.

Is this a valid reading?  Has anyone suggested this before?  Since it
bears upon my dissertation on the female succession in Tudor England, I
would be most grateful for any thoughts and references from listmembers.

Thanks in advance,
J.L. McIntosh
Dept. of History
The Johns Hopkins University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Barrett Graves <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 11 Nov 1997 18:27:32 -0700
Subject:        Help Locating Distributor of an Arden Shakespeare Title

My bookstore has run into difficulties while trying to order
*Shakespeare's Sonnets,* edited by Katherine Duncan-Jones (Arden
Shakespeare, Third Series).  The flyer I received stated that the book
would be available by 10/97 and it listed the ISBN number as
0-17-443473-1.

The flyer does not name a distributor (could it still be Methuen?).  My
bookstore liaison claims that the ISBN number fails to correspond with
any publisher known to her, which complicates matters.

Can anyone on the list help me locate the distributor for this volume?
Has it been released yet?  Responses should be directed to me personally
at the following address:

        
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 

Thanks to one and all for your assistance in locating this volume.

Debbie Barrett-Graves
The College of Santa Fe

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Stroffolino <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 12 Nov 1997 01:35:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 8.1128  No Matter
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1128  No Matter

Greetings SHAKPERians-

I have a question concerning what I consider to be a certain textual
"crux" (or at least one of those interesting ambiguities involving a
silent and/or silenced character) in TROILUS AND CRESSIDA--- How do you
read TROILUS's lines "words, words, no matter from the heart" when
Pandarus gives him Cressida's letter and he is about to rip it to
shreds?

I am particularly interested in the word "matter" here.

Is this best glossed as "Words are only words and thus they (words) are
no MATTER from the heart" or as "It doesn't even MATTER whether these
words are from the heart"??

I am attracted to the latter interpretation because it is harsher and
goes along with the severe skepticism to be found elsewhere in the play
concerning the value or even existence of any internal core that is not,
as Thersities says, "botchy" (or as Hector says "putrified"). Yet, I
cannot unequivocally side with this reading over the other reading.  The
fact that we never SEE or HEAR what Cressida's letter says makes it even
harder to decide which reading of these lines to accept.

If you favor Troilus, I suppose, you will agree with the former
interpretation. Is it possible that the "double meaning" I detect in the
word "matter" here didn't exist in Shakespeare's time? If so, I suppose
it would invalidate one of these readings and solve the ambiguity. Any
thoughts? ---------Chris Stroffolino
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.