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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: No Matter
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1149.  Friday, 14 November 1997.

[1]     From:   David Evett <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Nov 1997 13:05:36 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1142  Re: No Matter

[2]     From:   Julia MacKenzie <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Nov 1997 11:06:21 +1100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1138 No Matter


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Nov 1997 13:05:36 -0500
Subject: 8.1142  Re: No Matter
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1142  Re: No Matter

Beatrice's remark about words as "foul wind" suggests a contrast between
mere moving air and something more substantial, closer to the sense of
matter as solid material.  OED 3, "a vague designation for any physical
substance not definitely particularized" (first ref. c. 1400) relates
the term to the fluids of the body; that would include the blood
particularly associated with the heart, which would, unlike words, be
unable to lie.

Materially,
Dave Evett

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia MacKenzie <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Nov 1997 11:06:21 +1100
Subject: 8.1138 No Matter
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1138 No Matter

On the question of 'matter', I am reminded of the use of the word in "As
You Like It":

The Duke Senior says of Jaques - "I love to cope him in these sullen
fits,/ For then he's full of matter", in which case 'matter' can be
interpreted as thoughts, ideas, arguments, emotions.  This
interpretation can also be placed on both Troilus' and Hamlet's lines.
"Mere words, no matter from the heart" - empty words, not real thoughts
or ideas from the heart, and Hamlet's "words, words, words" being only
that, with no meaning or emotion.

What do you think?

Julia MacKenzie
 

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