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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: Complete Works; Arden Editions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1152.  Saturday, 15 November 1997.

[1]     From:   William Williams <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Nov 1997 09:18:20 -0600
        Subj:   Complete Works

[2]     From:   Stephen Boyd Fowler <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Nov 1997 11:20:02 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Re John McWilliam's search for definitive editions

[3]     From:   Evelyn Gajowski <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Nov 1997 09:09:37 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: Complete Works

[4]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Nov 1997 14:59:56 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1141  Re: Ordering Arden Editions


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Williams <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Nov 1997 09:18:20 -0600
Subject:        Complete Works

Joke, or no, there is certainly no definitive edition of  Shakespeare,
and there never will be.  There are "kinds" of editions, and there will
ever be more "kinds."  A starting place would be _Which Shakespeare?_
edited by Anne Thompson, et al. (Open University, 1992).  I'm not sure
if it ever was published in the USA.  Of course, things have moved on
since then with The Norton, Arden3, Folger2(?), but it's a good start.

By the way, I don't think Riverside was ever _the_ scholarly standard
edition.  Most US academics cited it because they used it as a textbook,
but the same would not be true from non-US scholars, and even in the US
many scholars cite Arden, New Oxford, New Cambridge, Bevington, Pelican,
etc.  That's why we keep on writing footnotes, endnotes, or works cited,
to tell our readers what textual choices we have made.  If I cite Norton
I have made a whole bunch of critical choices which are different from
the choices I have made if I cite Riverside.   For buying for reading I
think I would plump for the second printing of  Norton, which I am told
is being done on more "robust" paper.

William Proctor Williams
Department of  English
Northern Illinois University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Boyd Fowler <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Nov 1997 11:20:02 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Re John McWilliam's search for definitive editions

This may be a little late, but in response to the query on a definitive
edition of Shakespeare's complete works I would like to suggest the 1997
*Norton Shakespeare*. It is not "definitive"-there is and can never be a
definitive edition for obvious reasons-but it is comprehensive. There
are alternate readings for all of the texts including a number of
different versions of *King Lear* and others. The work also includes
many great bibliographic references chosen to assist the 'would-be'
Shakespeare scholar in beginning his or her research. The Honors Seminar
that I am currently enjoying uses this text and I have found it
extremely useful. So, for those of you who want ONE collected edition,
my vote is for the Norton.

(But do try to enjoy it none-the-less!)
Stephen

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Evelyn Gajowski <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Nov 1997 09:09:37 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Re: Complete Works

To John McWilliams:

I recommend the following edition of Shakespeare's complete works:

*The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition*.  Gen. ed.,
Stephen Greenblatt.  Introductory essays by Stephen Greenblatt, Walter
Cohen, Jean Howard, and Katharine Eisaman Maus.  Norton, 1997.

The original Oxford Text on which this edition is based is prepared by
Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor, gen. eds.  The General Intro. by
Greenblatt and the introductory essays to the plays by Greenblatt,
Cohen, Howard, and Maus incorporate the most recent theoretical/critical
developments in the discipline.  Strengths and weaknesses of this
edition were discussed on this list earlier this year, if I am not
mistaken.

Regards,
Evelyn Gajowski
University of Nevada, Las Vegas

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Nov 1997 14:59:56 -0500
Subject: 8.1141  Re: Ordering Arden Editions
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1141  Re: Ordering Arden Editions

>Any bookshop in the USA can order Arden Shakespeare titles from ITPS
>Customer Services, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042, tel 606 525
>6620. For other ordering information please see our website at
><<http://www.ardenshakespeare.com>

I called ITPS today, and they carry only nine titles (I think it was
nine) in the Arden series.  I moved to the web and ordered <italic>2
Henry IV</italic> in hard cover, which is listed as in print at the
Arden homepage, but which is not carried by ITPS.  We'll have to see
what happens.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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