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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: Hazle; Matter; Lady Anne; Kingship
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1159.  Monday, 17 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Jan Powell <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 11:29:10 -0800
        Subj:   Re: Hazle Shrew

[2]     From:   Cliff Ronan <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 11:08:07 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   No Matter

[3]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 16:57:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1158  Re: Lady Anne

[4]     From:   Stuart Manger <
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        Date:   Sunday, 16 Nov 1997 18:34:00 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 8.1158 Re: Kingship


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jan Powell <
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Date:           Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 11:29:10 -0800
Subject:        Re: Hazle Shrew

Shaula Evans asks:

>Why a "hazle" twig?  (other than for scansion) And in the midst of all
>these ostensible compliments, why does Petruchio call Katherine "browne
>in hue."

I believe Petruchio is using this line as an opportunity to compliment
and insult Katherine at the same time, as he does in the string of
"Kate" descriptions, thereby keeping her off balance and overwhelmed,
and possibly disarmed for the moment.  "Brown" is clearly an insult, and
while I don't know any specific reference to "hazel", the sound of the
"a" followed by the "z" gives Petruchio some lovely sounds with which to
annoy her, as in "should beeeee! should-buzzzzzz!".

Jan Powell,
Founding Artistic Director, Tygres Heart Shakespeare Co.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cliff Ronan <
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Date:           Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 11:08:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        No Matter

I am surprised that no one seems yet to have commented on another
quibbling sense in Shakespeare's references to "matter" in Hamlet and As
You Like It.  As my parents used the term, it referred (as in the OED)
to pus oozing from a wound or drying in the corner of the eye.  Cliff
Ronan, SWTSU

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Saturday, 15 Nov 1997 16:57:27 -0500
Subject: 8.1158  Re: Lady Anne
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1158  Re: Lady Anne

>Vanessa Redgrave was reported by the New York Times a year or two ago as
>telling a group of acting students that the wooing scene between Richard
>and Anne could not possibly work.

Perhaps she should ask her sister for some directorial help.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stuart Manger <
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Date:           Sunday, 16 Nov 1997 18:34:00 +0000
Subject: Re: Kingship
Comment:        SHK 8.1158 Re: Kingship

I agree with Kristine Batey on Claudius. I am currently teaching The
Tempest. Three 'kings' - well, six plus, if you count Caliban, on this
island: Prospero - second run at Lear through Faust? Alonso - devastated
by loss of Ferd.  Ferd who thinks he's king, and is a bit dazed by it
all, BUT not so much that he is not prepared to give it all up if he can
see the admired Miranda. And Stephano? Rank bad, drunken, tyrannical,
irrational absolute monarch, and totally self-deluded. Oh, and Antonio
who is de facto Duke of Milan, and Seb the kingmaker? so how's that for
a study of kingship? And Caliban? 'This island's mine' and 'I am all the
subjects that you have, that was mine own king'. And he's the one who
inherits the island after P returns to Milan? You want Shakespeare and
kingship?

You gottit!

Stuart Manger
 

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