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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: Ardens; No Matter; Cleopatra; Shakespeare Magazine
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1167.  Tuesday, 18 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Tom Clayton <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Nov 1997 10:25:56
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.1161  Re: Arden Editions

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Nov 1997 18:02:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1162  Re: No Matter

[3]     From:   Marilyn A. Bonomi <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Nov 1997 19:41:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1162  Re: Cleopatra and Antony

[4]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 17 Nov 1997 18:09:02 +0000
        Subj:   SHK 8.1157  Q: Shakespeare Mag


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Clayton <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Nov 1997 10:25:56
Subject: 8.1161  Re: Arden Editions
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.1161  Re: Arden Editions

ARDEN2s and 3s

Like Bill, I value the Arden2s, many of them above all editions of the
past 40 years, for my part, and am happy to be able to use as advanced
course and seminar texts those that are still in print (I like to use
one Arden2 along with either or both of more recent New
Cambridge/Oxford-World's Classics editions). When I tried to chase down
a couple of titles a few months ago, I was thoroughly confused by
finding more than one ISBN (*not* just pbk and hbk, entirely different)
and also the name of an editor not Arden2 so presumably of Arden3, which
was, however, unavailable. I mean specifically MV, for one, the
available Arden of which turned out to be John Russell Brown's
Arden2--in my view excellent-edition not much behind in what matters,
despite its age (for which it may in fact be the better), 1955,
corrected 1959.

I should add that many of the New Cambridge and Oxford-World's Classics
are fine in their way, and some of them even have introductions and
notes approaching Arden2 in thoroughness and erudition, and also add
valuable material on production; but most are pretty short on
appendices, especially of sources.

It would be a real public service, and possibly even a source of profit,
if some press undertook to keep some if not all Aarden2s in print even
as Arden3 churns on. All Arden2s are available on a CD-ROM, but that is
very costly (by my standards) and not the form in which I would want a
sole copy in, anyway, with a downloaded printout hardly a satisfactory
substitute for an actual *book*.

Cheers,
Tom

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Nov 1997 18:02:20 -0500
Subject: 8.1162  Re: No Matter
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1162  Re: No Matter

>But I must confess myself puzzled by Bill's insistence on the
>materialism of early modern thought; if medieval culture (angels
>tripping the light fantastic on the heads of pins) had tended that way,
>and passed that tendency along, the Renaissance had brought a strong
>infusion of Platonic idealistic dualism.  Marlowe and Shakespeare may,
>indeed, have hung on to the old tradition, but the other was active in
>Spenser and Donne.

I'm not so sure about Platonic dualism. How dualistic was Renaissance
Platonism? Henry More seems pretty materialistic to moi. Donne's
conception of the soul seems fairly materialistic: Some say now it goes,
and some say nay. Apparently there's a perceivable "it" to go. Spenser's
dualism is debatable. And think of Milton's concept of the universe
which is all of a piece from hell to the throne of god.  In fact, some
historians of ideas argue that the idea of transcendence of matter does
not occur in the Renaissance (i.e., before the late 17th century).

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marilyn A. Bonomi <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Nov 1997 19:41:20 -0500
Subject: 8.1162  Re: Cleopatra and Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1162  Re: Cleopatra and Antony

W. L. Godshalk writes:

>Caesar nudges Cleopatra to commit suicide. <snip>
>Is there any doubt how Cleopatra will react when Dolabella tells her
>that she will be sent, captive, to Rome?

Cleopatra is above all an actor-she stages every scene in which she
appears, and her suicide is as much an element of her performance as
every other action she takes, from the barge Enobarbus describes to her
donning of Antony's armor to her donning, for her final performance as
Queen of Egypt, all of the panoply of her office.

She even comments, in a classic bit of Shakespearean metatheatre, about
not being played on the stage by boys-what an image!  A boy speaking as
a woman and rejecting being played by a boy!

Cleo doesn't need nudging; she has recognized her options from the
moment of military defeat.  And none of them is palatable.  Her death is
simply the least distasteful.

Yours,
Marilyn Bonomi

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 17 Nov 1997 18:09:02 +0000
Subject: Q: Shakespeare Mag
Comment:        SHK 8.1157  Q: Shakespeare Mag

Virginia Bryne wrote

"Has anyone else who subscribes to the SHAKESPEARE magazine NOT got
their fall issue (on Macbeth)."

Has anyone EVER received an issue?  I subscribed through The Learning
Company a few months back and still await my first issue!

Mike Jensen
 

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