Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: Lady Anne; Cleopatra; Material; Sh. Mag.
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1180.  Thursday, 20 November 1997.

[1]     From:   Richard Regan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 20 Nov 1997 01:29:40 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Lady Anne

[2]     From:   Julia MacKenzie <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 20 Nov 1997 18:17:04 +1100
        Subj:   Re: Cleopatra

[3]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Nov 1997 17:04:06 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1171  Re: No Matter; Material

[4]     From:   Kristine Batey <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 19 Nov 1997 09:22:13 -0600
        Subj:   Shakespeare Magazine


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Regan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 20 Nov 1997 01:29:40 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Lady Anne

I would like to knit together two threads from recent postings: Anne's
seduction by Richard of Gloucester, and the comparison of Richard and
Iago.

The key is to see "Richard III" as caricature, which it certainly is by
contrast with both later histories and tragedies. The Richard of the
first three acts is written to be incredible for his ability to sweep
away obstacles in his path. Only in the final two acts does Shakespeare
make some gestures in the direction of rounding out the character, and
then only to make palatable his fall. His triumph over Anne is no more
convincing than the dumb show in Hamlet, where the Player Queen succumbs
instantly to the murderer. (What happened to Gertrude is another matter,
now the subject of another thread in this list.)

To compare Richard with Iago is to put a caricature next to a character
for whom Shakespeare had more ambitious plans. The Iago played by
Branagh or by Bob Hoskins in the BBC production works dramatically as a
sociopath whose plots seem possible, not incredible. If Olivier or
McKellan plays Richard for caricature, it seems to fit the play. If,
say, Christopher Plummer plays Iago for caricature (as he did on tour
with James Earl Jones), the play degenerates into a "bloody farce."

Richard Regan
Fairfield University

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia MacKenzie <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 20 Nov 1997 18:17:04 +1100
Subject:        Re: Cleopatra

Bill Godshalk writes

"Had Caesar responded with warmth, I think Cleopatra would have
refrained from suicide."

Shakespeare's Cleopatra is a character, on the stage and on the printed
page.  She behaves exactly as Shakespeare meant her to.  As such, she
doesn't actually have a will of her own, and to speculate, without
textual evidence, on how she might have reacted to different situations
is just that - speculation.

Julia MacKenzie

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Nov 1997 17:04:06 -0500
Subject: 8.1171  Re: No Matter; Material
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1171  Re: No Matter; Material

>If Godshalk could give us a defining example of post-C17 "transcendence

>of matter" ideas, then we could set about looking for something similar

>among the early moderns.

If you are interested in looking, you could consult: "Transcendental:
Antedated, Redefined," <italic>Notes and Queries</italic> 13 (1966):
254-5, regarding the idea of transcending matter in the 17th century.

About Donne's materialism, I say, "no contest," at least as far as I'm
concerned!

Regarding the materiality of "words," I don't think passages like
"Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart" are relevant. The
words may be material enough; they just happen to be lies; their subject
matter is not heartfelt. Caesar "words" Cleopatra.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kristine Batey <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 19 Nov 1997 09:22:13 -0600
Subject:        Shakespeare Magazine

>I subscribed to Shakespeare Mag this summer, asked to start with the
>Globe Opening issue, got that one, have received nothing further.  They
>have a web site: http://www.shakespearemag.com/ but as of this morning
>it was not responding.

I was able to connect this morning, 11/19.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.