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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: November ::
Re: The Herbal Bed
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1193.  Monday, 24 November 1997.

[1]     From:   John W. Mahon <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Nov 1997 18:05:02 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1187 The Herbal Bed

[2]     From:   Billy Houck <
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        Date:   Friday, 21 Nov 1997 22:51:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: The Herbal Bed

[3]     From:   John Velz <
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        Date:   Monday, 24 Nov 1997 00:38:03 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Herbal B-E-D


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Mahon <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Nov 1997 18:05:02 +0000
Subject: 8.1187 The Herbal Bed
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1187 The Herbal Bed

Friday evening

Dear SHAKSPER,

With regard to Mario Ghezzi's request for information on Peter Whelan's
play THE HERBAL BED, an interesting study of the play entitled
"Shakespeare's `Appearance' in THE HERBAL BED" appears in the
SUMMER/FALL issue of THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER, published this week and
soon to be in the mail to subscribers.  If Mr. Ghezzi sends us his
address, we will be happy to send him a copy of this article.

This special forty-page double issue of THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER
offers a number of attractive articles, including two comprehensive (and
quite different) retrospective assessments of the New York Shakespeare
Festival's Shakespeare Marathon and complete details (with photographs)
about the opening of the Globe on Bankside this summer.

THE SHAKESPEARE NEWSLETTER is available to U.S. subscribers for $12 per
year (please consider sending us $24 for two years at a time) for four
issues (in the past two years, subscribers have also received, without
additional charge, Extra Issues focused on particular aspects of
Shakespearean study) and to subscribers outside the U.S. for $14 per
year.  Please contact us at:
        Department of English
        Iona College
        715 North Avenue
        New Rochelle, NY 10801
Our e-mail address is 
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  or 
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 , and we can be
reached by phone at (914) 633-2061 and by Fax at (914) 637-2722.
Thanks!

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Billy Houck <
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Date:           Friday, 21 Nov 1997 22:51:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: The Herbal Bed

THE HERBAL BED is indeed a lovely play. I was lucky enough to see it in
Stratford 2 summers ago. I recommend JOHN HALL AND HIS PATIENTS -The
Medical Practice of Shakespeare's Son-In-Law by Joan Lane with medical
commentary by Melvin Earles. Published by the Shakespeare Birthplace
Trust. My copy cost about 12 pounds. It's a facsimile copy of Hall's
notebooks with a running commentary. Won't tell you much about Hall's
married life, but he sure did take copious notes.

Billy Houck

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Velz <
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Date:           Monday, 24 Nov 1997 00:38:03 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Herbal B-E-D

Mario Ghezzi inquires about *The Herbal Bed*.  This is the play that I
saw in London last July and wrongly called "The Herb Garden" when I
wrote recently to SHAKSPER about the Jacobean dialect the actors all
spoke.  (Too bad of me to eliminate the pun on BED)  The play is not so
much about Shakespeare as about the rise of arrogant puritanism, which
is critiqued quite movingly in the ecclesiastical court scene.  I got
the same sort of moral impulse from this production as from Arthur
Miller's *The Crucible*, though I do not think *the Herbal Bed* is in a
dramatic sense the play that Miller's is.  If I can find my playbill for
the production I will see what information it contains.

I suppose, Mr. Ghezzi, that we should keep this matter in SHAKSPER.  But
do not hesitate to write me personally and directly (see address above)
if you prefer.
 

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