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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Impermanent Permanence; AYL; Theatre Space
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0982.  Wednesday, 1 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Chris Fassler <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 08:05:09 -0400
        Subj:   Impermanent Permanence

[2]     From:   Abigail Quart <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 19:45:38 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0980  Many Queries

[3]     From:   Dale Lyles <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 07:24:08 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0976  In-the-round Performance of Tamburlaine I


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Fassler <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 08:05:09 -0400
Subject:        Impermanent Permanence

I've been away from SHAKSPER for a few days, so I'm lucky I happened to
read Norm Holland's recent post in its entirety.  Thanks, Dr. Holland.

I hope (without much reason) to be able to respond thoughtfully soon.

Cordially,

--Chris

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Abigail Quart <
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Date:           Tuesday, 30 Sep 1997 19:45:38 -0400
Subject: 8.0980  Many Queries
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0980  Many Queries

Rosalind is genuinely merry on reaching the Forest of Arden. The place
she has left was unnatural, brother turning against brother. Why did she
leave?  Because when the usurping Duke Frederick spoke to his daughter
and his niece, Rosalind answered first, as if she were still first lady
of the land. In the next scene he abruptly exiled Rosalind, warning
Cecilia that "she robs thee of thy name."

Even I ii, the scene always performed as a merry exchange between
playful young girls, can be read as a careful warning from Cecilia to
Rosalind not to let her true feelings show. Not a really fun, happy
environment.

On being released from the fear of such a place, wouldn't a bubble of
mirth rise in your soul? Wouldn't freedom feel giddy? Wouldn't physical
exhaustion matter very, very little?

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 07:24:08 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0976  In-the-round Performance of Tamburlaine I
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0976  In-the-round Performance of Tamburlaine I

Our theatre space is much as the one Norm Holland describes: long and
rectangular.  We have on occasion arranged the audience along both
sides, specifically for Henry VI, Part 3, and for at least part our
current Midsummer.

But I beat actors who try to play to a fourth wall.  There's the
audience: tell *them*!

Dale Lyles
Newnan Community Theatre Company
 

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