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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Macbeth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0991.  Thursday, 2 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 10:51:29 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth

[2]     From:   Sean Kevin Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 19:18:49 -0700
        Subj:   RE: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth

[3]     From:   H. R. Greenberg <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 22:23:43 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 10:51:29 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0984  Re: Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth

The Orson Welles MACBETH that Prof. Gretzinger mentioned may be found in
Richard France, ed. and with an introduction.  Orson Welles on
Shakespeare: The W.P.A. and Mercury Theatre Playscripts (Westport [Ct.]:
Greenwood Press, 1990). The version furnished is the stage production,
however, of the "Voodoo" MACBETH, not the Republic Pictures film, though
there are many similarities as well as differences.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Kevin Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 19:18:49 -0700
Subject: 8.0984  Re: Macbeth
Comment:        RE: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth

I'm wondering if anyone else notices a connection between the absent Sly
and the absent witches at the end of their respective plays.  Do both
leave possibilities disturbingly open?  The whole of _The Taming_, may
be enclosed by Sly's dream, but we are not offered (in F1, at least)
such an easy containment of the play.  Similarly, in _Macbeth_, the evil
which the witches represent may have been banished by Malcolm, but we
are not offered the satisfaction and certainly of seeing them exiled or
destroyed.

Could leaving the witches unaccounted for, present through their
absence, be a stronger statement of their ubiquity than having them
stroll around on the stage?  Witches, after all, are metaphysical
figures, and I'm reminded of how in Luther, the Deus Absconditus is so
much darker, more powerful and more terrifying than the Deus revelatus.
A Diabolus Absconditus might function similarly.

Cheers,
Sean.

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           H. R. Greenberg <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 22:23:43 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0984  Re: Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0984  Re: Macbeth

One of the most egregious misadventures regarding casting of the witches
was a church basement production in which my son-trained at London's
Central Drama school-had the misfortune to play MacDuff. Anent the
lunatic RICHARD III of Neil Simon's "THE GOODBY GIRL", this production
featured but two witches-thus whittled down by a lunatic director, so
that the two women could later play the two murderers. With "When shall
we TWO meet again..." still ringing in my ears at intermission, I
approached my kid and told him that if after four years of showcase
productions, this is what it came down to-"When shall we two meet
again..." maybe he needed a paradigm shift.  He's now a successful
screenwriter in Lalaland,  swears he won't act again or at least in the
near future-but I still yearn for the day when I can see him play in a
Macbeth worthy of his talents.

HR Greenberg
 

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