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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Pronunciation; Shrew; Two Questions
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.0994.  Thursday, 2 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 16:39:23 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Pronunciation; "feminine" endings

[2]     From:   Andrew Walker White <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 16:42:16 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0977 Re: Stratford Shrew

[3]     From:   Markus Marti <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Oct 1997 23:44:49 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0985  Re: Two Questions; Pronunciation


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 16:39:23 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Pronunciation; "feminine" endings

Not being as familiar with the variety of Scots dialects as I would
like, being on the wrong side of the puddle for that kind of thing, I
can only say that I've gathered my unscientific theory by listening to
some fine contemporary Scottish singers, most notably Dick Gaughan who
is able to use different dialects in his songs depending on the mood and
character he is trying to convey.  "Handful of Earth" in particular is a
favorite of mine.

As for the eleventh syllable, another interpretation, more valid I
think, comes from looking at Hamlet's To Be Or Not To Be:  an extra
syllable indicates ongoing thought, thinking out loud as it were, as if
the idea were not really finished in the Prince's head and just came
out.  Likewise the Wounded Captain in the Scottish Tragedy (the play
that dare not speak its name), whose eleven-syllable lines are more an
indication of sheer exhaustion.

Can't stand the term "feminine" endings, by the way, although I still
find it used.  How about some alternatives?

Andy White
Arlington, VA

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Walker White <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 1 Oct 1997 16:42:16 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.0977 Re: Stratford Shrew
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0977 Re: Stratford Shrew

When we tried this interpretation in Illinois, the previous scene when
Petruchio and Kate are arguing about the sun/moon, we added a bit of
unspoken business in which Petruchio said to her, "work with me on this,
there's a reason for my being contrary, and it's not really all that
sinister".  This was the only way to present her final speech as a
deliberate con job.  From what I could tell (being in Hortensio's shoes)
this worked with our audience.

Andy White
Arlington, VA

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Markus Marti <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 01 Oct 1997 23:44:49 +0000
Subject: 8.0985  Re: Two Questions; Pronunciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0985  Re: Two Questions; Pronunciation

"To be or not to be - that is the quest" : true.
"To be or not to be - that is the question": doubtful - if not a lie.

My name - o shame - I must confess - has got
no stress on "i" ['ee']. Your liar, Markus Marti.
 

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