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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Macbeth
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1007.  Monday, 6 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Skip Nicholson <
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        Date:   Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 13:25:11 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.0999  Re: Macbeth

[2]     From:   Tim Richards <
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        Date:   Monday, 06 Oct 1997 18:42:16 +0800
        Subj:   SHK 8.0999  Re: Macbeth


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Nicholson <
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 >
Date:           Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 13:25:11 -0700
Subject: 8.0999  Re: Macbeth
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.0999  Re: Macbeth

While we're on Macbeth adaptations, the Johannesburg Civic Theater's
production of Welcome Msomi's "Umbatha" (or sometimes "Mbatha"), the
Zulu Macbeth rages and steams with power. The dialogue's in Zulu, so the
text is gone, for those of us who don't understand the tongue. You can
argue all night about the relative power of Shakespeare's verbal poetry
and Msomi's "body poetry" and never come to a consensus (even with
yourself, I found). But Shakespeare's more fun to argue about than just
about anything else. Isn't that what this list is all about?

"Umbatha" is absolutely worth seeing. It's trekking around the U.S. now.

Skip Nicholson
South Pasadena (CA) HS

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tim Richards <
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Date:           Monday, 06 Oct 1997 18:42:16 +0800
Subject: Re: Macbeth
Comment:        SHK 8.0999  Re: Macbeth

Eric Salehi wrote:

>does anyone know of a production in which the witches figured as the
>Three Fates?  Perhaps the connection sounds obvious, but I can't recall
>a production that's been done that way, with the sisters wielding
>thread, scissors and the whole equipage.

We didn't go that far in our production earlier this year at the
University of Western Australia, but the director did make a conscious
decision in casting a "mother, maiden and crone" as the witches.  It
certainly helped differentiate the three characters, as their various
ages were reflected in their mannerisms and actions (the youngest was
quite obviously a novice witch).  An interesting and effective idea.

Tim Richards.
 

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