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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1008.  Monday, 6 October 1997.

[1]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 22:22:32 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet

[2]     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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 >
        Date:   Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 22:31:27 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 22:22:32 -0400
Subject: 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet

T. Hawkes writes:

>Hilarious! It's the way you tell them, Bill.

Yes, I know the joke.  The prisoners have all the jokes numbered. A new
prisoner is told this fact.  He hears one of the old lags shout 36--and
everyone laughs at great length.  So the new prisoner waits a day or
two, and shows 36.  No one laughs. The new guy asks one of the old
prisoners why no one laughed at his 36 when everyone laughed
outrageously when the old lag shouted 36. The answer: "Some people can
tell a joke; some people can't."

There are variations on the theme.

Obviously, I can tell a joke. Thanks, Terence.

Yours, Bill Godshalk

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 05 Oct 1997 22:31:27 -0400
Subject: 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1000  Re: Some Notes on the CSF Hamlet

>How did they [CSF] play the relationship with Ophelia, as a
>lesbian love affair or in some other manner?
 asks Tim Richards.

Actually, it was played as the ambiguously gay duo. Some audience
members felt that Hamlet and Ophelia were just friends, while others
felt that the relationship was definitely gay. In rehearsal, I pushed
for openly gay, but Marni Penning who played Hamlet resisted, while
Ophelia (Jill Westerby) was more comfortable with my suggestion (only on
stage, of course). I thought it worked well-as did most of the audience
members.  Cincinnati really was and is really for innovative theatre.
The play has been received extremely well by the traditionally
conservative Cincinnatians.

Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

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