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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Classroom Strategies
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1010.  Tuesday, 7 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Louis C Swilley <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Oct 1997 09:15:13 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

[2]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Monday, 06 Oct 1997 18:09:19 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies -Reply

[3]     From:   Roger Gross <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Oct 1997 15:03:41 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

[4]     From:   Stephan B. Paragon <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Oct 1997 01:03:06 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis C Swilley <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Oct 1997 09:15:13 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

When I taught Shakespeare in high school, I realized early on that the
students did not understand what the characters were saying.  I
abandoned that odious quantitative rule ("the class must cover all of
'Macbeth' in two weeks"), depending on summaries, if that answered the
needs for standard tests, and spent the time in every class having a
student read a sentence, then asking a student to paraphrase it and to
defend the paraphrase by indicating where in the original he/she got
that idea. Progress was slow but sound, if ever sound there was. We then
moved from speech to speech, questioning the motivation of the character
in making such a remark. The students accepted it as the "detective
work" it was.

Anyone wanting to try this should particularly consider the sergeant's
speech in I,ii *Macbeth*.

L. Swilley

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Monday, 06 Oct 1997 18:09:19 +0100
Subject: Re: Classroom Strategies -Reply
Comment:        SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies -Reply

>>I began by showing a version of The Taming of the Shrew, produced
>>back in the 60's or 70's, on video, by a group in San Francisco.
>>Someone may be able to identify this, as I have forgotten the details.

>I also remember watching on PBS this production, which was by, if I
>remember correctly, the San Francisco Repertory Company. Does
>anyone know if it's available in video? - Peter C. Herman

You are both thinking of the Shrew  produced by the American
Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco.  It starred Marc Singer and Fredi
Ostander(sp?).  It is not available on video, alas, only archivally.  I
very much want to see it for something I am writing.  It looks like a
New York viewing booth or nothing.  Ostander, BTW, has a book out on
Shrew, written with her husband, Rick Hamilton.

Your one stop trivia shop,
Mike Jensen

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger Gross <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Oct 1997 15:03:41 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

I think that the SHREW production Peter was thinking of was by the
American Conservatory Theatre in San Francisco, William Ball directing.

Roger Gross
U. Arkansas

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephan B. Paragon <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Oct 1997 01:03:06 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1006  Re: Classroom Strategies

Why don't you show how Shakespeare effect's our every day lives? Or how
great a word inventor he was. Shakespeare conceived many words.
Assassination, Lousy, Or phrases: The milk of human kindness, The
world's my oyster. No end to it.
 

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