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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Re: Classroom Strategies
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1017.  Thursday, 9 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Karen Krebser <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Oct 1997 08:38:05 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1013 Re: Classroom Strategies

[2]     From:   Eva McManus <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Oct 1997 18:02:27 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Classroom Strategies

[3]     From:   Robert Linn <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Oct 1997 20:19:22 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1003  Re: Classroom Strategies


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Karen Krebser <
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Date:           Wednesday, 08 Oct 1997 08:38:05 -0700
Subject: 8.1013 Re: Classroom Strategies
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1013 Re: Classroom Strategies

> My advice on classroom strategy is this: Go to the theater, start with
> easy modern plays, move on to Shakespeare's Comedies, then try the
> tragedies. At this stage - AT THE EARLIEST - consider getting a copy of
> the text for the students to look at.
>
> Peter Hillyar-Russ

But the POETRY, man, the POETRY!!! Often that level of Shakespeare's
plays is lost on the stage (depending upon the production), and is best
appreciated by a reading of the play FIRST. It has also been my
experience that, because there are four hundred years between
Shakespeare's English and mine, reading the play first is a BIG help in
understanding the performance.

Best regards,
Karen Krebser

PS. Surely you're not comparing *any*thing Shakespeare wrote to
"Baywatch"? "The X Files," maybe... but in any event, it's apples and
oranges, from my view.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Eva McManus <
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Date:           Wednesday, 8 Oct 1997 18:02:27 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Classroom Strategies

For those  unfamiliar with our publication, "Shakespeare and the
Classroom" is a journal published twice yearly that focuses on teaching
Shakespeare.  Our range is broad enough to cover all academic levels.
We provide articles on teaching strategies as well as news of books,
articles, films/videos and other teaching aids.  We regularly provide
information on the educational outreach programs of Shakespeare
festivals and theatres and review their productions. The journal
includes calls for papers, announcements of conferences, reviews of
conferences and workshops as well as notices of  upcoming productions.
Each edition contains commentary on the state of education in the US,
linking it specifically to our concern with teaching Shakespeare.  In
fact, our recent 92-page special Spring edition contained not only
articles on teaching, the usual Contexts and Opinion sections, but also
two significant studies-Dennis Brestensky's "A Search for Master
Teachers" and C. W. Griffin's "Teaching Shakespeare:  A Report" that
analyzed data from an extensive study of teaching methods and emphases
in college and university Shakespeare classes.  The journal routinely
includes media commentary on education issues as well. Other features
address electronic media by reporting on Shakespeare websites, including
the Globe sites, and uses of technology in the classroom.

"Shakespeare and the Classroom" is jointly sponsored by Ohio Northern
University and Shakespeare's Globe (USA).  We provide information about
Globe Education programs in the US, England and other international
Globe sites.  Over the years our publication has followed the
development of the new Globe; we provided construction updates and then
carried several articles on last year's Prologue Season dealing with the
logistics of staging in the theatre.   The summer courses offered by
Globe (USA) (mentioned in Jason Rosenbaum's recent note to SHAKESPER)
and the 1997 Globe Opening Season are discussed in our fall 1997
edition, due out later this month.  This edition will also contain an
index to the first four years of publication.

The subscription rate is $8.00 per year ($12.00 international). Send
subscription requests and manuscripts to:

        Eva McManus
        English Department
        Ohio Northern University
        Ada, OH  45810

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Linn <
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Date:           Wednesday, 08 Oct 1997 20:19:22 -0400
Subject: 8.1003  Re: Classroom Strategies
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1003  Re: Classroom Strategies

Concerning classroom strategies or ideas, I have taught A Midsummer
Night's Dream to non-college prep seniors in high school for more years
than I care to remember.  In most of those years, we have ended our
study with a class production of the workman's play. The students learn
the lines, prepare the costumes and props, select music, and come up
with -- -um "dramatic ideas."  We put the production on for other
students, usually about one hundred, and the production has become one
of the traditions for the end of school.  Putting on a dress and playing
Thisbe has helped more than one good ol' boy graduate.  I have
videotapes of these performances that go back over fifteen years.  If
anyone is interested in the specifics of what I do and how, you are
welcome to contact me off list.

Bob Linn (
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