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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Shakespeare magazine's Fall issue
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1022.  Thursday, 9 October 1997.

From:           Mike LoMonico <
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Date:           Wednesday, 08 Oct 1997 16:50:27 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare magazine's Fall issue

Shakespeare magazine, sponsored by Georgetown University and Cambridge
University Press announces its Fall 1997 issue.

Contents:

Featured Articles

"Sex Me Here"  Phyllis Rackin (UPenn) asks why did Shakespeare's Lady
Macbeth nurse her own baby.

"King James and the Witches"  Boyd Berry (Virginia Commonwealth
University) connects Shakespeare's "Weird Sisters" with Renaissance
works on witchcraft.

"Teaching Macbeth"  Several teachers share their ideas:

"Found Poetry in Macbeth"  Kathleen Breen sends her students to the
words of  Macbeth and Lady Macbeth to find poetry.

"Wake Duncan with Thy Knocking" Michelle Peeling brings Duncan back to
life and stages a murder investigation.

"Give Sorrow Words" Hilary Zunin teaches the art of condolence in the
context of Macbeth.

"Macbeth: The Love Story" Julia Shields looks beyond the violence to
find a tragic story of sacrificee
spoke together" resonate in an interesting way.  They also fill in for
the servants in the Macbeths' castle-beginning with the sleepwalking
scene and onward to the end, so that as the violence in the play
progresses, their presence is increasingly felt.  By Macbeth's last
scene on the battlements (Tomorrow, etc.), all of the messengers-the
cream faced loon- and Seyton himself are witches.  One of the witches
even fights on Macbeth's side in the last battle-"come, Fate, unto the
list".  When Macbeth is killed, he is covered in the red web.  Their
presence throughout the piece seems to have a strongly positive effect
on our high school audiences (the only ones who have seen it as yet).
For me, their presence helps greatly a director who was required to find
means other than light and recorded sound to achieve the nightmarish
quality of the play.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <
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Date:           Tuesday, 7 Oct 1997 19:43:29 -0400
Subject:        Re: =========================================================================
Date:         Fri, 10 Oct 1997 11:47:08 -0400
Reply-To:     
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Sender:       The Shakespeare Electronic Conference <
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From:         "Hardy M. Cook" <
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Organization: Bowie State University
Subject: Re: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:      SHK 8.1023  Re: Oth-Inspired Film
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The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1023.  Friday, 10 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Bruce Golden <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 09:50:52 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[2]     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 11:50:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020 Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[3]     From:   Mike Jensen <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Oct 1997 17:25:28 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[4]     From:   Tom Marshall <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 12:57:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[5]     From:   Kevin J. Donovan <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 13:23:37 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: Responses to Othello

[6]     From:   David Crosby <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 15:22:30 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Spike Lee film

[7]     From:   Werner Habicht <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 97 23:12 MET DST
        Subj:   SHK 8.1020 Othello

[8]     From:   Hugh Howard Davis <
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        Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 18:38:39 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[9]     From:   Bill Gelber <
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        Date:   Thursday, 09 Oct 1997 23:51:11 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

[10]    From:   Richard Nathan <
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Date:   Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 21:00:13 +0000
Subj:   Re: SHK 8.1020  Oth-Inspired Film

[11]    From:   Paul Franssen <
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Date:   Friday, 10 Oct 1997 10:01:56 -0600 (CST)
Subj:   RE: Oth-Inspired work


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce Golden <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 09:50:52 +0000
Subject: 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

Machado de Assis, _Dom Casmurro_ (sp?).  Great Brazillian writer at the
turn of the twentieth century; great novel with an _Othello_ theme.

-Bruce Golden

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 11:50:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.1020 Q: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020 Q: Oth-Inspired Film

Kenneth Rothwell's "Shakespeare on Screen" (the source for all things
Shakespearean and filmed) lists the following movies inspired by
"Othello" :

"Carnival" (1921 silent/1931 sound) : actors playing "Othello" begin to
mirror the play's events in their lives

"Men are Not Gods" (1936) Story of an actor's life while playing
"Othello" and the reviewer who falls in love with him.

"A Double Life" (1947) another version of actors who begin to confuse
their real lives with the events of the play they are acting.

"Jubal" (1956) A Western version of the play.

"All Night Long" (1962) Othello in the world of modern jazz.

"Catch My Soul" (1973) Othello as rock musical.

There is also, of course, Verdi's "Otello"

Annalisa Castaldo

[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mike Jensen <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Oct 1997 17:25:28 +0100
Subject: Q: Oth-Inspired Film -Reply
Comment:        SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film -Reply

The answer to Barrett Fisher's question that will probably be given most
often is The Double Life, an American movie with Ronald Coleman.  It is
usually classed as a film noir.  Coleman plays an actor given the role
of Othello.  His private life begins to mirror his character on stage.

I do not recall an Iago character, and his "reel" life Desdemona is
hardly cut from the same cloth as Shakespeare's character.  Still, it is
an entertaining film and was released on video a year or two ago.

There are, of course, Ran and Throne of Blood.  They are in a strange
dimension between adaptation and re-imagination, not quite either.

Best of luck,
Mike Jensen

[4]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Marshall <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 12:57:15 -0500
Subject: 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

Othello-Inspired film:

In 1955 or 56 there was a film released called _Jubal_ with Glenn Ford,
Ernest Borgnine, Julie London, and Rod Steiger, loosely based on
Othello.  It's a western that focuses on jealousy.  Ford is Cassio;
Borgnine, Othello; London, Desdemona,; and Steiger, Iago-his character
is called "Pinky" as I recall.  The film does not deal with race, but
more with the sheepman-cattle rancher feud.  It's an interesting
adaptation, and the studio did not have to give Shakespeare screen
credit because, as Sam Goldwyn once said in ordering Dickens' name off
the credits in a film:  "He's dead.  Screw him."  O tempore, O mores.

Tom Marshall

[5]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kevin J. Donovan <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 13:23:37 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Re: Responses to Othello

This is probably an obvious one, obviously not an adaptation, but since
your query broadened out to include "responses," here goes: the "feelie"
*Three Weeks in a Helicopter* in *Brave New World*, Ch 11.

[6]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Crosby <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 15:22:30 -0500
Subject:        Re: Spike Lee film

Barrett Fisher has probably already remembered that the Spike Lee film
that deals with an affair between an African-American man and an
Italian-American woman is "Jungle Fever," not "Do the Right Thing."
Also, the "Denzel Washington" character was played by Wesley Snipes. I
guess they do look a little bit alike.

David Crosby
Alcorn State University

[7]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Werner Habicht <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 97 23:12 MET DST
Subject: Othello
Comment:        SHK 8.1020 Othello

Novels partially inspired by *Othello* would seem to include John
Fowles' The Magus (in which, towards the end, allusions to The Tempest
give way to those to Othello); John Gardner, Every Night's a Bullfight
(trivial theatre novel, also about Romeo and Juliet);  Nadine Gordimer,
My Son's Story; perhaps also S.  Rushdie, Satanic Verses. Nothing
remotely comparable with 1000 Acres, of course.  However, Charles
Marowitz's play An Othello may deserve to be remembered. Should one add
the short story by Allan Massie, "Ossie: a Dumb Black Ox" (in
Shakespeare Stories, ed. Giles Gordon, 1982)? And don't forget that at
the beginning of Bernard Shaw's Heartbreak House the female main
character falls asleep while reading Othello - a significant fact in
that play.

W.H.

[8]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hugh Howard Davis <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 18:38:39 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

One _Othello_ based film is _Jubal_, a western from the late 1950s.

Hugh Davis

[9]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Gelber <
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Date:           Thursday, 09 Oct 1997 23:51:11 -0700
Subject: 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020  Q: Oth-Inspired Film

A film entitled "Jubal" is an adaptation of the Othello play with Rod
Steiger as the Iago character.  (It is a western.)

[10]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Nathan <
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Date:           Thursday, 9 Oct 1997 21:00:13 +0000
Subject: 8.1020  Oth-Inspired Film
Comment:        Re: SHK 8.1020  Oth-Inspired Film

The film that immediately comes to mind is "A Double Life"  (1947) in
which Ronald Coleman plays an actor who gets so caught up in portraying
Othello on stage that he ends up murdering a woman.  I'm told there is a
similar British film from 1936 entitled "Men Are Not Gods," but I've
never seen that one.

There was a rock musical adaptation entitled "Catch My Soul" -- but I
never saw that one either.

[11]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Franssen <
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Date:           Friday, 10 Oct 1997 10:01:56 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        RE: Oth-Inspired work

In response to Barrett Fisher's query:

There are a number of adaptations of *Othello* for the stage, using
(largely) the same cast of characters, but challenging the original's
perceived racism.

Charles Marowitz's *An Othello* comes to mind (published in *Open Space
Plays* (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1974), as well as a more recent rewrite
by C. Bernard Jackson entitled *Iago*, which was produced in the Los
Angeles Theatre Center last year-I do not know of any published version.
I was not really impressed by the latter, I must add. Both might do for
teaching purposes, depending on the level of the students.

Paul Franssen
Dept. of English
University of Utrecht
The Netherlands
 

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