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Home :: Archive :: 1997 :: October ::
Qs: Vision in Macbeth; Concordance; Early Modern
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 8.1051.  Monday, 20 October 1997.

[1]     From:   Cameron Thomas Jones <
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        Date:   Friday, 17 Oct 1997 12:54:47 -0300 (ADT)
        Subj:   Re: Vision in Macbeth

[2]     From:   Alicia Ellison <
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        Date:   Saturday, 18 Oct 1997 15:38:15 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Concordance

[3]     From:   Cameron Anderson <
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        Date:   Sunday, 19 Oct 1997 23:40:15 -0400
        Subj:   Early Modern Closet


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cameron Thomas Jones <
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Date:           Friday, 17 Oct 1997 12:54:47 -0300 (ADT)
Subject:        Re: Vision in Macbeth

Considering Macbeth...

I thought it would be interesting to bring up the continuous use of
vision, or lack there of, in Macbeth.  Specifically the first two acts.

        The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be
        Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.(52-53 I, iv)

        That my keen knife see not the wound it makes (50 I, v)

                                To beguile the time,
        Look like the time; bear welcome in you eye, ((61-62 I, v)

There are quite a few other examples of this forced blindness.  If one
considers the witches as visionaries, it is interesting that Shakespeare
affords some characters the vision outward, and forces others to contain
similar vision. ie.  The witches tell Macbeth he will be Thane of Cawdor
and King...Macbeth/Lady Macbeth must cast blinds on their eyes as to
present a front to the others.

[2]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alicia Ellison <
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Date:           Saturday, 18 Oct 1997 15:38:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Concordance

[Editor's Note: Below is a request from a non-member.  If you wish to
respond, please do so directly to Alicia Ellison
<
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Hello. I'm not a subscriber to your list, and I really am not looking to
become one. However, I would appreciate it if I could post a message to
the list, to prevail upon the expertise of the subscribers. I'm looking
for a good layman's concordance to Shakespeare, something which perhaps
would retail at close to $50 or under. I'm not looking for a lot of
commentary, but rather something that would work similar to a Bible
concordance, i.e. keyword searching to passages in the plays and
sonnets.

May I post such a message, with a request that replies be sent directly
to me?

Thank you.

Alicia Ellison, Librarian
Tampa-Hillsborough Public Library System
Science Library at MOSI (Museum of Science & Industry)
4801 E. Fowler Avenue
Tampa, Florida  33617
(813) 987-6378   fax: 987-6381   
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[3]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cameron Anderson <
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 >
Date:           Sunday, 19 Oct 1997 23:40:15 -0400
Subject:        Early Modern Closet

Dear all,

I am currently writing a senior honors thesis at Wesleyan Universtiy on
gendered representations of the closet on the early modern English
stage. I am interested in finding closet scenes acted on the stage. I am
not interested in bed chamber scenes. I am aware of the closet scenes in
Hamlet, The Merry Wives, and The Changling. In connection with closet
scenes, I am interested in the change of staging which took place at the
beginning of the 17th century, in which closet scenes were brought out
of the tiring house alcove to occupy the main stage. Thank you very
much.

Sincerely,
Cameron Anderson
 

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